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I have a project which requires printing a HTML table with many rows.

My problem is the way the table is printed over multiple page. It will sometimes cut a row in half, making it unreadable because one half is on the bleeding edge of a page and the remainder is printer on the top of the next page.

The only plausible solution I can think of is using stacked DIVs instead of a table and force page-breaks if needed.. but before going through the whole change I thought I could ask here before.

Any ideas ?

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12  
On a tangent, it might be worth adding a <thead> to your table with the following css thead {display: table-header-group; } so as to print the table-header on all subsequent pages (useful for loooooong data tables). –  David Thomas Nov 19 '09 at 14:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 85 down vote accepted
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
    table { page-break-inside:auto }
    tr    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
    thead { display:table-header-group }
    tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <table>
        <thead>
            <tr><th>heading</th></tr>
        </thead>
        <tfoot>
            <tr><td>notes</td></tr>
        </tfoot>
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
        <!-- 500 more rows -->
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
    </table>
</body>
</html>
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1  
This does not work in all browsers. It does seem to work in FireFox 3.6 Mac OS. –  daustin777 Oct 8 '10 at 14:23
1  
Unfortunately it seems to not work in FF4 @ W7 –  Tomas Tintera May 8 '11 at 14:15
4  
This also fails in WebKit browsers (eg. Safari and Chrome) –  Michael Haren Mar 14 '12 at 19:51
3  
While this is the standards-compliant way to do this, the only browser that currently implements the standard is Opera. Note that this is part of css2, and so the lack of implementation is likely to be a problem for some time to come, because apparently no-one cares. –  pkh May 8 '12 at 19:16
7  
The CSS 2.1 specification indicates that page break style attributes are only applied to block-level elements. The default display mode for table rows is table-row. Unfortunately, no table elements are block level elements by default, including the table itself. –  lthibodeaux Nov 30 '12 at 21:07

Note: when using the page-break-after:always for the tag it will create a page break after the last bit of the table, creating an entirely blank page at the end every time! To fix this just change it to page-break-after:auto. It will break correctly and not create an extra blank page.

<html>
<head>
<style>
@media print
{
  table { page-break-after:auto }
  tr    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
  td    { page-break-inside:avoid; page-break-after:auto }
  thead { display:table-header-group }
  tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
....
</body>
</html>
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Expanding from Sinan Ünür solution:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
<title>Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
    table { page-break-inside:auto }
    div   { page-break-inside:avoid; } /* This is the key */
    thead { display:table-header-group }
    tfoot { display:table-footer-group }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <table>
        <thead>
            <tr><th>heading</th></tr>
        </thead>
        <tfoot>
            <tr><td>notes</td></tr>
        </tfoot>
        <tr>
            <td><div>Long<br />cell<br />should'nt<br />be<br />cut</div></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td><div>Long<br />cell<br />should'nt<br />be<br />cut</div></td>
        </tr>
        <!-- 500 more rows -->
        <tr>
            <td>x</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
    </table>
</body>
</html>

It seems that page-break-inside:avoid in some browsers is only taken in consideration for block elements, not for cell, table, row neither inline-block.

If you try to display:block the TR tag, and use there page-break-inside:avoid, it works, but messes around with your table layout.

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1  
Here's an easy way to add the divs dynamically with jquery: $(document).ready(function(){$("table tbody th, table tbody td").wrapInner("<div></div>");}); –  Chrisbloom7 Sep 11 at 5:26
    
Thanks @Chrisbloom7, that can be very usefull! ;-) –  vicenteherrera Sep 12 at 11:15

Use these CSS properties:

page-break-after

page-break-before 

For instance:

<html>
<head>
<style>
@media print
{
table {page-break-after:always}
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
....
</body>
</html>

via

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1  
It works on table rows ? –  h3. Nov 19 '09 at 14:27
    
I'm not sure, you'll have to check. If not, split into different arrays and separate the arrays by an empty div –  marcgg Nov 19 '09 at 14:27
    
(or on the "table" element) –  marcgg Nov 19 '09 at 14:28
    
You will have to apply it to the table row or even cell, but not to the table, I think. Other than that, it should work. –  Pekka 웃 Nov 19 '09 at 14:29
1  
does not work in chrome. Is ignored as if 6/13/2012 when applied to TR –  ladieu Jun 13 '12 at 19:33

None of the answers here worked for me in Chrome. AAverin on GitHub has created some useful Javascript for this purpose and this worked for me: https://github.com/AAverin/JSUtils/blob/master/wkhtmltopdfTableSplitHack/wkhtmltopdf_tableSplitHack.js

Just add the js to your code and add the class 'splitForPrint' to your table and it will neatly split the table into multiple pages and add the table header to each page.

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Do you have sample on how to apply this? I've been trying to assign my table className as splitForPrint but in the JS there's nowhere it took the reference of the element using the className splitForPrint. Only the part where var splitClassName = 'splitForPrint'; but that's it. –  Compaq LE2202x Aug 20 at 3:05
    
Down voted because the script you linked to does not solve the OP's problem without considerable cherry-picking and reconfiguring, and you didn't provide any examples of how one might go about doing it. –  Chrisbloom7 Sep 12 at 15:05

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