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Update: On ruby I'm trying to remove next element if it is smaller than previous.

the input will be

a = [2,1,3,4,7,6,8]

so the output will be

a = [2,3,4,7,8]

obviously if none if all are sequential there will be no element removed.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by sawa, bensiu, mishik, Rubens, Code Lღver Jul 15 '13 at 5:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Your question statement is wrong. The numbers you removed are 1 and 6. The elements after them are bigger, not smaller. –  jwpat7 Jul 14 '13 at 4:14
    
May be you want to remove next element if it is smaller than previous? –  Yuriy Golobokov Jul 14 '13 at 4:33
    
yuri that's right let me updated it –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 8:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would do it like this:

a.each_index.map { |i| a[i] if i < 1 || a[i-1] < a[i] }.compact
 => [2, 3, 4, 7, 8]
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this one does the work, tnx Yuriy –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 9:03
b = a.take(1) + a.each_cons(2).flat_map { |x, y| y >= x ? [y] : [] } 
#=> [2, 3, 4, 7, 8]
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this one also works –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 9:10
a.each_cons(2).reject{|x, y| x > y}.map(&:first) + [a.last]
# => [1, 3, 4, 6, 8]
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it gives [1, 3, 4, 6, 8] for me. but he wanted [2,3,4,7,8] –  Yuriy Golobokov Jul 14 '13 at 4:31
    
@YuriyGolobokov It gives the same result for me as it did to you. Look at the output I wrote. The OP is contradictory. –  sawa Jul 14 '13 at 4:36
    
oops. yes, the question doesn't match the example. –  Yuriy Golobokov Jul 14 '13 at 4:39

Keep track of what the previous value was, and use select to filter out the values that you don't want.

prev = - 1.0/0.0 #negative infinity
a.select {|num| delete = (prev < num); prev = num; delete}

On the input [2, 1, 3, 4, 7, 6, 8] this gives the output [2, 3, 4, 7, 8].

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if you have an array like [1,2,3] it removes the first one –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 9:07
    
Huh, it's working fine for me. It doesn't seem like it should behave badly on [1, 2, 3], since -Infinity should be less than everything. Is this a Ruby version difference maybe? I'm on 2.0.0, what about you? –  Eli Rose Jul 14 '13 at 14:43
    
I'm on ruby 1.9 for some reason is removing the first one –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 18:18
    
Check to see if prev actually equals infinity at the beginning. –  Eli Rose Jul 14 '13 at 18:22
    
this is the output note.io/15du78e –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 18:24
a = [2,1,3,4,7,6,8]

prev = a[0]
p a.chunk { |e|
  prev, prev2 = e, prev
  prev<prev2
}.flat_map{|i,j| j unless i }.compact
# >> [2, 3, 4, 7, 8]

Update

As @zetacu said:

if you have an array like [1,2,3] it removes the first one

No it will not be stopped working.

a = [1,2,3]
prev = a[0]
p a.chunk { |e|
  prev, prev2 = e, prev
  prev<prev2
}.flat_map{|i,j| j unless i }.compact
# >> [1, 2, 3]
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if you have an array like [1,2,3] it removes the first one –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 9:05
    
@zetacu no dear! Run the code,it is working as expected.. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 14 '13 at 9:09
    
mm my bab maybe I type something extra in the console –  zetacu Jul 14 '13 at 18:22

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