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I a beginner learning python and doing some python exercises and I have a generic question about why one piece of code works and another does not. This code I wrote below works just fine:

def sort_last(tuples):
  def MyFn(tuples):
    return tuples[-1]
  a = sorted(tuples, key=MyFn)
  return a

Intuitively I thought this might work and tried it. It does not:

def sort_last(tuples):
  a = sorted(tuples, key=tuples[-1])
  return a

Will someone explain why the second piece does not work? I have looked it up: #sorted Is it because a list or tuple is not a function? Is it because it is more than one argument?

Thanks in advance!

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It's worth noting that the MyFn function that you define in the first version of the code gets called with a single value from your sequence, so your argument name should probably be different. It's not illegal to reuse the name, but it does make it a bit harder to understand. –  Blckknght Jul 14 '13 at 7:47

3 Answers 3

From the Docs:

key specifies a function of one argument that is used to extract a comparison key from each list element

So, you could pass a callable object with one argument. You could rewrite second example with lambda:

def sort_last(tuples):
    return sorted(tuples, key=lambda t: t[-1])

Or, as suggested by @ersran9, you could use operator.itemgetter:

import operator

def sort_last(tuples):
    return sorted(tuples, key=operator.itemgetter(-1))
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I guess using operator.itemgetter would be neater. –  ersran9 Jul 14 '13 at 5:36
    
And the reason your code didn't work was that key= would be evaluated there and then, getting as its value a static reference to the last element from tuples. –  tripleee Jul 14 '13 at 5:48
    
@ersran9, Added, thank you. –  soon Jul 14 '13 at 5:58
    
@tripleee, Not sure if I understood you correctly - which code didn't work? –  soon Jul 14 '13 at 5:59
    
Sorry, that was directed at the OP. –  tripleee Jul 14 '13 at 6:00

To answer your question, the reason why your second code snippet doesn't work is that the "key" parameter to the sorted function is supposed to contain a recipe for an item's sorting weight. The sorted() function will run this recipe on every item in the list you're sorting. When you say key=tuples[-1], the expression "tuples[-1]" is evaluated once, right away. The result of that evaluation is the last tuple in the list, which is passed into the sorted function. The sorted function is expecting a recipe (a function) that can be executed; it gets a tuple instead, and tuples can't be executed. (What would executing a tuple even mean, anyway?)

When you say "tuples[-1]", you're running a computation to extract the last element from a variable. When you say "MyFn", you're referring to the recipe without running it. If you want a syntax that looks like "tuples[-1]", you can use the lambda operator as noted in soon's answer.

To see this in action, we can follow my personal programming motto: "When in doubt, print stuff out." If you don't fully understand what your program's doing, you can insert print statements all over the place to give you a better idea of what's happening.

Here's a version of your program with some informative print statement:

def MyFn(tuples):
    print "inside MyFn: tuples =", tuples, "returning", tuples[-1]
    return tuples[-1]

tuples = [("a", 3), ("b", 2), ("c", 1)]
print "sorting: tuples =", tuples

a = sorted(tuples, key=MyFn)
print "the sorted list is", a

and the output is very informative:

sorting: tuples = [('a', 3), ('b', 2), ('c', 1)]
inside MyFn: tuples = ('a', 3) returning 3
inside MyFn: tuples = ('b', 2) returning 2
inside MyFn: tuples = ('c', 1) returning 1
the sorted list is [('c', 1), ('b', 2), ('a', 3)]

As you can see, the "sorted" library function calls your MyFn recipe three times!

This output also makes it obvious that there's a little style issue with your code. You're using the variable name "tuples" for different things at different places in your program. In MyFn the name refers to a single tuple, whereas at the outer level it refers to the initial unsorted list of tuples. Your code works, but it is confusing! I suggest using a different variable as the argument to MyFn, like this:

def MyFn(e):
    return e[-1]

tuples = [("a", 3), ("b", 2), ("c", 1)]
a = sorted(tuples, key=MyFn)
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This is False Code Dont Put function in an Other function; Using OOP Programming Or Takeout the function (MyFn)> like this :

def sort_last(tuples):
   a = sorted(tuples, key=MyFn)
   return a
def MyFn(tuples):
   return tuples[-1]
tubles=("var","share","far","Bar")
print MyFn(tubles)
print sort_last(tubles)

Or by The OOP Programming :

#!/usr/bin/python
class Mr_sam:
        def sort_last(self,tuples):
                self.tubles=tubles
                a = sorted(tuples, key=self.MyFn)
                return a
        def MyFn(self,tuples):
                self.tubles=tubles
                return tuples[-1]
tubles=("var","share","far","Bar")
Go=Mr_sam() #Take a Object from class Mr_sam Go is a copy from Mr_sam
print Go.sort_last(tubles);Go.MyFn(tubles) # take the 2 attribute from Object Go 
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