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I am looking to pass function getCoordinates's returned object literal (which are longitude and latitude coordinates) to function getWeather in the form of an argument so I am able to access function getCoordinates's object literal in function getWeather. Or in other words, I am looking to pass the output of one function as the input to another function so I am able to access it's data. How would I go about accomplishing this?

Here's my JavaScript code so far:

var APP = {
    getCoordinates: function () {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
                var coordinates = {
                    latitude: position.coords.latitude,
                    longitude: position.coords.longitude
                }
                return coordinates;
            });
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },

    getWeather: function (getCoordinates) {
        var api_key = '1234567890',
            weather_query = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += longitude + ',' + latitude + '.json';
    }
}
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2  
A nitpick: a literal is the source-code representation of a value. A function doesn't return a literal, it returns a value (such as an object). –  ruakh Jul 14 '13 at 5:28
    
Can't you just evaluate getCoordinates inside getWeather? –  Nikola Dimitroff Jul 14 '13 at 5:30
1  
navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition is asynchronous, so return isn't really an option. Have you tried adjusting getCoordinates to accept and call a callback of its own? –  Jonathan Lonowski Jul 14 '13 at 5:31
    
If you're using jQuery, promises and deferreds works great for this. –  adeneo Jul 14 '13 at 5:35
    
@adeneo - I'm not using jQuery just pure vanilla JavaScript. For something like this, is it really necessary to bring in jQuery or can it be accomplished with vanilla easily? –  Matt Jul 14 '13 at 5:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var APP = {
    getCoordinates: function () {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(this.getWeather);
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },
    getWeather: function (position) {
        var latitude       = position.coords.latitude,
            longitude      = position.coords.longitude,
            api_key        = '1234567890',
            weather_query  = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += longitude + ',' + latitude + '.json';

        // do weather lookup here, inside success handler of
        // the geolocation call
    }
}

APP.getCoordinates();

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
I would say this is the best answer, except for adding an unnecessary framework when the user does not really need jQuery. –  zz3599 Jul 14 '13 at 5:45
    
@zz3599 - I can't use jQuery...It has to be pure vanilla JavaScript. –  Matt Jul 14 '13 at 5:46
1  
removed jQuery, now just plain JS. –  adeneo Jul 14 '13 at 5:47
    
@adeneo Beautiful :) –  Matt Jul 14 '13 at 5:56

What you're trying to do is impossible. So you need to rethink it. Note that navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition() takes a callback function. This means, as @JonathanLonowski pointed out, that the function is asynchronous. That is, the callback function is called later in time, whenever the value passed to it becomes available.

Returning a value from this callback doesn't do any good. What you need to do instead is do any required actions within that callback, or in another function that the callback calls (essentially the same thing).

What code calls getWeather()? That's the code you're going to need to look at. Instead of just making that call at an arbitrary time, the call should be made from the getCurrentPosition() callback, and whatever you do with weather_query should be done then and there.

As the code sits right now, getWeather() doesn't actually do anything. It creates a couple of local variables that are then discarded. So this may be the next issue to look at.

Whatever you do, the bottom line is the same: any action that depends on the coordinates from the getCurrentPosition() callback needs to take place at the time that callback gets called.

As @adeneo mentioned, there are tools such as jQuery's promises that you can use to help write cleaner code to do this. But no tool will change the fundamental problem: You have to wait until the data is ready, and one way or another this will amount to taking action either directly or indirectly from that callback.

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Just returning coordinates will not do anything. You have to accept a callback parameter:

var APP = {
    // Get the coordinates, and then do something with them
    getCoordinates: function (callback) {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
                var coordinates = {
                    latitude: position.coords.latitude,
                    longitude: position.coords.longitude
                }
                // Coordinates are ready, pass to the processing function
                callback(coordinates);
            });
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },

    getWeather: function (coordinates) {
        var api_key = '1234567890',
            weather_query = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += coordinates.longitude + ',' + coordinates.latitude + '.json';
    }
}

APP.getCoordinates(APP.getWeather);
share|improve this answer
    
This kind of worked, however; I'm receiving the following output when I console.log(weather_query) it: api.wunderground.com/api/0142ba544a593cec/geolookup/q/… –  Matt Jul 14 '13 at 5:41
    
@Matt - look at the URL in that query. See the problem? –  Michael Geary Jul 14 '13 at 5:43
    
longitude and latitude need a getCoordinates. before them. (Though i'd strongly suggest a better name, like coordinates.) –  cHao Jul 14 '13 at 5:43
    
Ah, the original getWeather had another mistake. –  Koterpillar Jul 14 '13 at 5:44
1  
@Matt - I would expect that is the problem. As several of the answers describe, you need to do this work from the callback function, not at an arbitrary time which may be before the callback has done its work. –  Michael Geary Jul 14 '13 at 5:47

Adeneo has a great answer. Just to supplement it:

Let's change getCoordinates so that it now takes a callback that can do whatever processing you want on the location data.

getCoordinates: function (callback) {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(callback);
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },

Now, all getWeather has to do is provide that callback function.

getWeather: function () {
        var callback = function(position){
            var coordinates = {
                    latitude: position.coords.latitude,
                    longitude: position.coords.longitude
             };
            var api_key = '1234567890',
            weather_query = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += coordinates.longitude + ',' + coordinates.latitude + '.json';
            console.log(weather_query);
        };
        APP.getCoordinates(callback);

    }

You can continue using APP.getWeather to get your data. This pattern can be extended for any other sorts of processing you need to do with the location data.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds great, but how do you call the local variable callback from another property in an object literal ? –  adeneo Jul 14 '13 at 5:59
    
I don't see why it is needed. The point is that each function provides a custom callback. –  zz3599 Jul 14 '13 at 6:06

Why not like so? See changes in function getWeather().

var APP = {
    getCoordinates: function () {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
                var coordinates = {
                    latitude: position.coords.latitude,
                    longitude: position.coords.longitude
                }
                return coordinates;
            });
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },

    getWeather: function (coordinates) {
        var api_key = '1234567890',
            weather_query = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += coordinates.longitude + ',' + coordinates.latitude + '.json';
    }
}

// function call:

APP.getWeather(APP.getCoordinates());
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3  
But isn't .getCurrentPosition() asynchronous? –  nnnnnn Jul 14 '13 at 5:36
2  
That was my first thought, too -- you can't see it, but I have a deleted answer saying much the same thing -- but as Jonathan Lonowski points out in a comment to the question, APP.getCoordinates() doesn't actually return the coordinates; rather, it launches an asynchronous function call, and the passed-in callback returns the coordinates. (Uselessly, since nothing ever sees the callback's return-value.) –  ruakh Jul 14 '13 at 5:36
1  
This does not work. getCurrentPosition returns the position asynchronously through the callback. There is no guarantee that getWeather even receives any coordinates. –  zz3599 Jul 14 '13 at 5:36
    
I'm unable to get this to work...but this is along the lines of what I was thinking. –  Matt Jul 14 '13 at 5:39
    
Oh, sorry I missed that. –  Ridcully Jul 14 '13 at 8:36

You can do it using a callback function, like

var APP = {
    getCoordinates: function (cb) {
        if (navigator.geolocation) {
            navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(cb);
        } else {
            console.log("Geolocation isn't supported in your browser.");
        }
    },

    getWeather: function () {
        this.getCoordinates(function(cord){
            var api_key = '1234567890',
            weather_query = 'http://api.wunderground.com/api/';
            weather_query += api_key + '/geolookup/q/';
            weather_query += cord.longitude + ',' + cord.latitude + '.json';

            // now you have it
            console.log(weather_query);
        });
    }
}
APP.getWeather();

DEMO.

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