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I'd like to expose a property on a view model that contains a list of objects (from database).

I need this collection to be read-only. That is, I want to prevent Add/Remove, etc. But allow the foreach and indexers to work. My intent is to declare a private field holding the editable collection and reference it with a read-only Public Property. As follows

public ObservableCollection<foo> CollectionOfFoo { 
     get { 
         return _CollectionOfFoo;
     }
}

However, that syntax just prevents changing the reference to the collection. It doesn't prevent add/remove, etc.

What is the right way to accomplish this?

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5 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

The [previously] accepted answer will actually return a different ReadOnlyObservableCollection every time ReadOnlyFoo is accessed. This is wasteful and can lead to subtle bugs.

A preferable solution is:

public class Source
{
    Source()
    {
        m_collection = new ObservableCollection<int>();
        m_collectionReadOnly = new ReadOnlyObservableCollection<int>(m_collection);
    }

    public ReadOnlyObservableCollection<int> Items
    {
        get { return m_collectionReadOnly; }
    }

    readonly ObservableCollection<int> m_collection;
    readonly ReadOnlyObservableCollection<int> m_collectionReadOnly;
}

See ReadOnlyObservableCollection anti-pattern for a full discussion.

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I don't like using ReadOnlyObservableCollection<T> as it seems like a mistake / broken class; I prefer a contract based approach instead.

Here is what I use that allows for covarience:

public interface INotifyCollection<T> 
       : ICollection<T>, 
         INotifyCollectionChanged
{}

public interface IReadOnlyNotifyCollection<out T> 
       : IReadOnlyCollection<T>, 
         INotifyCollectionChanged
{}

public class NotifyCollection<T> 
       : ObservableCollection<T>, 
         INotifyCollection<T>, 
         IReadOnlyNotifyCollection<T>
{}

public class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var full = new NotifyCollection<string>();
        var readOnlyAccess = (IReadOnlyCollection<string>) full;
        var readOnlyNotifyOfChange = (IReadOnlyNotifyCollection<string>) full;


        //Covarience
        var readOnlyListWithChanges = 
            new List<IReadOnlyNotifyCollection<object>>()
                {
                    new NotifyCollection<object>(),
                    new NotifyCollection<string>(),
                };
    }
}
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You could change the type of your property to be an IEnumerable:

public IEnumerable<foo> CollectionOfFoo { 
     get { 
         return _CollectionOfFoo;
     }
}

I don't believe there is a standard interface that exposes an indexer. If you need it you could write an interface and extend ObservableCollection to implement it:

public interface IIndexerCollection<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    T this[int i]
    {
        get;
    }
}

public class IndexCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T>, IIndexerCollection<T>
{
}
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Remember, though, if CollectionOfFoo is say, a List<foo>, and the caller knows this, it can cast CollectionOfFoo back to List<foo>, and do add/remove operations. This works, but its not bullet-proof. –  Charlie Salts Nov 19 '09 at 14:47
    
Binding to an ItemsSource. This answer works, but should be avoided. –  jberger Mar 14 '12 at 21:45
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You could also override the list class that you're using and put an immutable flag in one of the constructors such that it will not add/remove if it was constructed with the immutable flag set to true.

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Use ReadOnlyObservableCollection< T >

public ReadOnlyObservableCollection<T> ReadOnlyFoo
{
    get { return new ReadOnlyObservableCollection<T> (_CollectionOfFoo); }
}

As has been pointed out, please use Eric J's answer as this one mistakenly is returning a new instance every time.

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Thankyou, that's the ticket. There are sooooo many objects to choose from in the framework how does one discover them all! Thanks. –  thrag Nov 20 '09 at 7:34
2  
Note thought that INotifyCollectionChanged changed of ReadOnlyObservableCollection<T> is protected, and thus to access the event hookup you need to cast explicitly to INotifyCollectionChanged. An alternative would be to extend the ROOC to expose that event publicly (which it should have in the first place imho) and file a MSDN bug report on the current implementation. :) –  GaussZ Jan 11 '10 at 21:17
    
@GaussZ Yes nice catch, why is it not public? It makes no sense at all to me. I might extract this into a new SO question to see if anyone else has some insight on this. –  Oskar Jan 13 '10 at 15:57
6  
As @Eric J. has pointed out, returning a new ReadOnlyObservableCollection every time the property is accessed makes it difficult for clients to correctly unsubscribe from events (which is presumably why it's a ReadOnlyObservableCollection, and not just a ReadOnlyCollection). –  Bradley Grainger Jun 1 '10 at 18:19
1  
virtual -1. This will almost always be the wrong approach. –  flq Jan 14 '11 at 13:50
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