Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I created a lock object wrapper (class) that use semaphoreSlim(1) as a lock mechanism for my manager (class) operations.
My manager class contains a lock that i send on construction of the new wrapper class, then i use Await on this wrapper class lock (that actually awaits the lock i sent it on construction). and release it on Dispose (the purpose of the wrapper class is to automatically lock and release, lock upon construction, and release upon dispose).

I Use this pattern for the new lock wrapper i built:

//_syncLock is a class that used as member lock to use in my operations as async lock.
using (OperationSyncLockWrapper syncLock = new OperationSyncLockWrapper(_syncLock))
{
    await syncLock.Wait(); //I wish to avoid this line and run it automatically
    await SomeAsyncOperation(parameter1);
}  

Since i cannot use async/await in a constructor method. Is there another way to await on the new object i just created - on class construction or right after ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, unfortunately, you cant split object construction into co-routines. Hence, cant use async on constructor.

You can consider exposing your wrapper API with a factory pattern.

using (var syncLock = await OperationSyncLockWrapperFactory.GetInstanceAsync(_syncLock))
{
    await SomeAsyncOperation(parameter1);
}

You can await in the factory method:

public static class OperationSyncLockWrapperFactory {

    public static async Task<OperationSyncLockWrapper> GetInstaceAsync(YourSyncLockClass _syncLock)
    {
        OperationSyncLockWrapper syncLock = new OperationSyncLockWrapper(_syncLock);
        await syncLock.Wait();

        return syncLock;
    }
}    

EDIT: Thanks Stephen for the suggestion. Agree that with extension methods, using the API would be much clearer. Based on your suggestion, it would be something like this:

using (var syncLock = await _syncLock.GetSyncLockWrapperInstanceAsync())
{
    await SomeAsyncOperation(parameter1);
}

And the extension class:

public static class YourSyncLockClassExtensions {

    public static async Task<OperationSyncLockWrapper> GetSyncLockWrapperInstanceAsync
                                                        (this YourSyncLockClass _syncLock)
    {
        OperationSyncLockWrapper syncLock = new OperationSyncLockWrapper(_syncLock);
        await syncLock.Wait();

        return syncLock;
    }
}    

EDIT 2: When you expose an async API to other developers with your library, generally, you dont want to capture the SynchronizationContext when you await inside the library - this is also a best practice. In your case too, now that you await in the factory method, you would want to consider not to capture the SynchronizationContext.

In the factory method:

await syncLock.Wait().ConfigureAwait(false);
share|improve this answer
    
This would be even cleaner if the factory method were an extension method for the _syncLock type. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 14 '13 at 11:29
    
@StephenCleary: Thanks. Updated answer based on your suggestion –  YK1 Jul 14 '13 at 11:51
    
thanks for dedicating time, this is a nice work-around –  ilansch Jul 14 '13 at 20:44

The only way to await currently is to actually use that keyword as well as async modifier on the method declaration which translates your method into co-routines.

You can't simulate co-routine creation without those keywords to produce the same behavior they provide.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.