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SQL Server 2005/2008 Express edition has the limitation of 4 GB per database. As far as I known the database engine considers data only, thus excluding log files, unused space, and index size.

Getting the length of the MDF file should not give the correct database size in terms of SQL Server limitation. My question is how to get the database size?

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7 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

sp_spaceused

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sp_spaceused takes into account the log file size, so if you have a really small db and a really big log file, the result from sp_spaceused will be misleading when trying to determine how close you are to the 4GB limit. –  Lamar Dec 28 '08 at 7:08
    
The question explicitly asks for log file to be included. Is he misguided about log file applying toward the 4 GB limit? –  David B Dec 29 '08 at 14:37
    
+1 for shortness. I love short answers! –  ren Apr 2 '12 at 20:18
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sp_helpdb

no looping needed, unlike sp_spaceused.

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Great!! Really helps. –  Tathagat Verma Jul 7 '11 at 9:29
    
Gives out allocated DB size (size of mdf file), not actual used size. –  Mrchief yesterday
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According to SQL2000 help, sp_spaceused includes data and indexes.

This script should do:

CREATE TABLE #t (name SYSNAME, rows CHAR(11), reserved VARCHAR(18), 
data VARCHAR(18), index_size VARCHAR(18), unused VARCHAR(18))

EXEC sp_msforeachtable 'INSERT INTO #t EXEC sp_spaceused ''?'''
-- SELECT * FROM #t ORDER BY name
-- SELECT name, CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(data, 1, LEN(data)-3)) FROM #t ORDER BY name
SELECT SUM(CONVERT(INT, SUBSTRING(data, 1, LEN(data)-3))) FROM #t
DROP TABLE #t
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This is a GREAT answer. Thanks for the script - very helpful! –  Kevin Babcock May 19 '11 at 3:28
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In SQL Management Studio, right-click on a database and select "Properties" from the context menu. Look at the "Size" figure.

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The best solution is maybe to calculate the size of each database file, using the sys.sysfiles view, considering a size of 8 KB for each page, as follows:

USE [myDatabase]
GO

SELECT
    [size] * 8
    , [filename]
FROM sysfiles

The [field] column represents the size of the file, in pages (MSDN Reference to sysfiles).

You would see there will be at least two files (MDF and LDF): the sum of these files will give you the correct size of the entire database...

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5  
+1 SELECT SUM(size)/128.0 AS size FROM sysfiles returns the same value as sp_spaceused, but might be easier to analyse automatically. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Dec 11 '12 at 7:14
    
Yes, much easier! –  MAXE Dec 11 '12 at 8:14
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You could use this old fashioned one as well...

set ANSI_NULLS ON
set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
go

DECLARE @iCount int, @iMax int, @DatabaseName varchar(200), @SQL varchar (8000)

Select NAME, DBID, crdate, filename, version 
INTO #TEMP
from MAster..SYSDatabASES 

SELECT @iCount = Count(DBID) FROM #TEMP

Select @SQL='Create Table ##iFile1 ( DBName varchar( 200) NULL, Fileid INT, FileGroup int, TotalExtents INT , USedExtents INT , 
Name varchar(100), vFile varchar (300), AllocatedSpace int NUll, UsedSpace int Null, PercentageFree int Null ) '+ char(10)
exec (@SQL)


Create Table ##iTotals ( ServerName varchar(100), DBName varchar( 200) NULL, FileType varchar(10),Fileid INT, FileGroup int, TotalExtents INT , USedExtents INT , 
Name varchar(100), vFile varchar (300), AllocatedSpace int NUll, UsedSpace int Null, PercentageFree int Null ) 


WHILE @iCount>0
BEGIN    
    SELECT @iMax =Max(dbid) FROM #TEMP
    Select @DatabaseName = Name FROM #TEMP where dbid =@iMax

    SELECT @SQL = 'INSERT INTO ##iFile1(Fileid , FileGroup , TotalExtents  , USedExtents  , Name , vFile)
     EXEC (''USE [' + @DatabaseName +  '] DBCC showfilestats'')    ' + char(10)

    Print  (@SQL)
    EXEC (@SQL)


    SELECT @SQL = 'UPDATE ##iFile1 SET DBName ='''+ @DatabaseName +''' WHERE DBName IS NULL'
    EXEC  (@SQL)


    DELETE FROM #TEMP WHERE dbid =@iMax
    Select @iCount =@iCount -1
END
UPDATE ##iFile1
SET AllocatedSpace = (TotalExtents * 64.0 / 1024.0 ), UsedSpace =(USedExtents * 64.0 / 1024.0 )

UPDATE ##iFile1
SET PercentageFree = 100-Convert(float,UsedSpace)/Convert(float,AllocatedSpace   )* 100
WHERE USEDSPACE>0

CREATE TABLE #logspace (
   DBName varchar( 100),
   LogSize float,
   PrcntUsed float,
   status int
   )
INSERT INTO #logspace
EXEC ('DBCC sqlperf( logspace)')



INSERT INTO ##iTotals(ServerName, DBName, FileType,Name, vFile,PercentageFree,AllocatedSpace)
select @@ServerName ,DBNAME,  'Data' as FileType,Name, vFile, PercentageFree  , AllocatedSpace
from ##iFile1
UNION
select @@ServerName ,DBNAME, 'Log' as FileType ,DBName,'' as vFile ,PrcntUsed  , LogSize
from #logspace

Select * from ##iTotals

select ServerName ,DBNAME,  FileType, Sum( AllocatedSpace) as AllocatedSpaceMB
from ##iTotals
Group By  ServerName ,DBNAME, FileType
Order By  ServerName ,DBNAME, FileType


select ServerName ,DBNAME,  Sum( AllocatedSpace) as AllocatedSpaceMB
from ##iTotals
Group By  ServerName ,DBNAME
Order By  ServerName ,DBNAME



drop table ##iFile1
drop table #logspace
drop table #TEMP
drop table ##iTotals
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I always liked going after it directly:

SELECT 
    DB_NAME( dbid ) AS DatabaseName, 
    CAST( ( SUM( size ) * 8 ) / ( 1024.0 * 1024.0 ) AS decimal( 10, 2 ) ) AS DbSizeGb 
FROM 
    sys.sysaltfiles 
GROUP BY 
    DB_NAME( dbid )
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