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Sometimes when I run code made asynchronous using async and await, I find that some parts of the code don't even get executed. For example in the following code, "Sleeping2" is not shown on the console screen:

public static void Sleeping(int millis)
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("Sleeping1");
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(millis);
    System.Console.WriteLine("Sleeping2");
}

public static async void SleepingAsync(int millis)
{
    await System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Run(() => Sleeping(millis));
}

public static async void DoSleepingMain()
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("DoSleepingMain1");
    SleepingAsync(12000);
    System.Console.WriteLine("DoSleepingMain2");
}

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DoSleepingMain();
}

Another example is the following in which neither Sleeping1 or Sleeping2 are displayed. I don't understand this because I await the Task in the DoSleepingMain method.

public static void Sleeping(int millis)
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("Sleeping1");
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(millis);
    System.Console.WriteLine("Sleeping2");
}

public static async Task SleepingAsync(int millis)
{
    System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Run(() => Sleeping(millis)); //warning: call not awaited
}

public static async void DoSleepingMain()
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("DoSleepingMain1");
    await SleepingAsync(12000);
    System.Console.WriteLine("DoSleepingMain2");
}

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DoSleepingMain();
}

Any explanation (or pointer to explanations) would be appreciated! Thanks

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You've just discovered why you should never write async void.

If you write an async void method, you have no way of knowing when the asynchronous part finishes.

This includes Main(); your program is exiting as soon as it hits the first await.

async methods are mostly useless in console programs; if you really want to try them, you'll need to call .Wait() on the Tasks returned to Main().

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Maybe I should start experimenting with asynchrony in a WinForms or WPF app. What you said makes sense. Thanks! –  Mzn Jul 14 '13 at 11:57
2  
I agree re async void, but disagree re async Console apps. I have found them useful many times, though I usually use my AsyncContext instead of Wait. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 14 '13 at 17:17
1  
@StephenCleary: You're right; async can be useful when running IO-bound operations in parallel. However, console apps are the wrong way to experiment with async. –  SLaks Jul 14 '13 at 18:01
    
Thanks Stephen for you input. I agree with you both, that's why SLaks said "mostly" useless such as in my circumstances where there wasn't anything to keep the app from just exiting. But surely a console application could use the TPL, do lots of IO, etc... –  Mzn Jul 14 '13 at 19:03
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