Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following vector in R. Think of them as a vector of numbers.

x = c(1,2,3,4,...100)

I want to randomize this vector "locally" based on some input number the "locality factor". For example if the locality factor is 3, then the first 3 elements are taken and randomized followed by the next 3 elements and so on. Is there an efficient way to do this? I know if I use sample, it would jumble up the whole array. Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

General solution:

Edit: As @MatthewLundberg comments, the issue I pointed out with "repeating numbers in x" can be easily overcome by working on seq_along(x), which would mean the resulting values will be indices. So, it'd be like so:

k <- 3
x <- c(2,2,1, 1,3,4, 4,6,5, 3)
x.s <- seq_along(x)
y <- sample(x.s)
x[unlist(split(y, (match(y, x.s)-1) %/% k), use.names = FALSE)]
# [1] 2 2 1 3 4 1 4 5 6 3

Old answer:

The bottleneck here is the amount of calls to function sample. And as long as your numbers don't repeat, I think you can do this with just one call to sample in this manner:

k <- 3
x <- 1:20
y <- sample(x)
unlist(split(y, (match(y,x)-1) %/% k), use.names = FALSE)
# [1]  1  3  2  5  6  4  8  9  7 12 10 11 13 14 15 17 16 18 19 20

To put everything together in a function (I like the name scramble from @Roland's):

scramble <- function(x, k=3) {
    x.s <- seq_along(x)
    y.s <- sample(x.s)
    idx <- unlist(split(y.s, (match(y.s, x.s)-1) %/% k), use.names = FALSE)
    x[idx]
}

scramble(x, 3)
# [1] 2 1 2 3 4 1 5 4 6 3
scramble(x, 3)
# [1] 1 2 2 1 4 3 6 5 4 3

To reduce the answer (and get it faster) even more, following @flodel's comment:

scramble <- function(x, k=3L) {
    x.s <- seq_along(x)
    y.s <- sample(x.s)
    x[unlist(split(x.s[y.s], (y.s-1) %/% k), use.names = FALSE)]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice approach+1 –  Tyler Rinker Jul 14 '13 at 15:24
    
+1 This will probably win the benchmarks. –  Roland Jul 14 '13 at 15:26
1  
If the numbers do repeat, apply this function to seq_along(x) and use the output to index x with [. –  Matthew Lundberg Jul 14 '13 at 15:32
    
@MatthewLundberg, brilliant! I'll make the edit (if you don't beat me to it). –  Arun Jul 14 '13 at 15:33
1  
I don't think you need match. You can do unlist(split(x[y], (y-1) %/% k), use.names = FALSE). Also, things should be faster if k <- 3L (an integer). –  flodel Jul 14 '13 at 15:49

This will drop elements at the end (with a warning):

locality <- 3
x <- 1:100
c(apply(matrix(x, nrow=locality, ncol=length(x) %/% locality), 2, sample))
## [1]  1  2  3  4  6  5  8  9  7 12 10 11 13 15 14 16 18 17 19 20 21 22 24 23 26 25 27 28 30 29 32 33 31 35 34 36 38 39 37
## [40] 42 40 41 43 44 45 47 48 46 51 49 50 54 52 53 55 57 56 58 59 60 62 61 63 64 65 66 67 69 68 71 72 70 74 75 73 78 77 76
## [79] 80 81 79 83 82 84 87 85 86 88 89 90 92 93 91 96 94 95 99 98 97
share|improve this answer

I like Matthew's approach way better but here was the way I did the problem:

x <- 1:100
fact <- 3

y <- ceiling(length(x)/fact)

unlist(lapply(split(x, rep(1:y, each =fact)[1:length(x)]), function(x){
    if (length(x)==1) return(x)
    sample(x)
}), use.names = FALSE)

##   [1]   3   1   2   6   4   5   8   9   7  11  10  12  13  15  14  17  16  18
##  [19]  20  21  19  24  23  22  26  27  25  29  30  28  31  32  33  35  34  36
##  [37]  39  37  38  41  42  40  45  43  44  47  46  48  51  49  50  52  53  54
##  [55]  57  56  55  59  60  58  63  62  61  64  66  65  67  68  69  70  71  72
##  [73]  75  73  74  77  76  78  80  79  81  82  84  83  85  86  87  90  89  88
##  [91]  92  91  93  96  94  95  98  99  97 100
share|improve this answer
v <- 1:16

scramble <- function(vec,n) {
  res <- tapply(vec,(seq_along(vec)+n-1)%/%n,
                FUN=function(x) x[sample.int(length(x), size=length(x))])
  unname(unlist(res))
}

set.seed(42)
scramble(v,3)
#[1]  3  2  1  6  5  4  9  7  8 12 10 11 15 13 14 16

scramble(v,4)
#[1]  2  3  1  4  5  8  6  7 10 12  9 11 14 15 16 13
share|improve this answer

For the record, the boot package (shipped with base R) includes a function permutation.array() that is used for just this purpose:

x <- 1:100
k <- 3
ii <- boot:::permutation.array(n = length(x), 
                               R = 2, 
                               strata = (seq_along(x) - 1) %/% k)[1,]
x[ii]
#   [1]   2   1   3   6   5   4   9   7   8  12  11  10  15  13  14  16  18  17
#  [19]  21  19  20  23  22  24  26  27  25  28  29  30  33  31  32  36  35  34
#  [37]  38  39  37  41  40  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  51  50  49  53  52  54
#  [55]  57  55  56  59  60  58  63  61  62  65  66  64  67  69  68  72  71  70
#  [73]  75  73  74  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  86  87  85  89  88  90
#  [91]  93  91  92  94  95  96  97  98  99 100
share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. But I'd like to point out that this function is inefficient (at least for this task). They use a table on strata. This'll be time-consuming as x is large and has lot of unique entries. They internally use a function rperm on each group where rperm is sample0(x, length(x)). In other words, they call sample many times as well. Running this function on larger x (even 1e3 or 1e4, for example) clearly shows the difference. –  Arun Jul 14 '13 at 18:21
    
@Arun -- OK. I posted another answer, which is fast, and calls sample() zero times, which I think you'll appreciate. I think it's currently the best answer here. What do you think? –  Josh O'Brien Jul 14 '13 at 18:42
    
Brilliant! Yes indeed, that's the fastest and the best answer. –  Arun Jul 14 '13 at 18:52

Arun didn't like how inefficient my other answer was, so here's something very fast just for him ;)

It requires just one call each to runif() and order(), and doesn't use sample() at all.

x <- 1:100
k <- 3
n <- length(x)

x[order(rep(seq_len(ceiling(n/k)), each=k, length.out=n) + runif(n))]
#  [1]   3   1   2   6   5   4   8   9   7  11  12  10  13  14  15  18  16  17
# [19]  20  19  21  23  22  24  27  25  26  29  28  30  33  31  32  36  34  35
# [37]  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  47  48  46  51  49  50  52  54  53
# [55]  55  57  56  58  60  59  62  63  61  66  64  65  68  67  69  71  70  72
# [73]  75  74  73  76  77  78  81  80  79  84  82  83  86  85  87  89  88  90
# [91]  93  92  91  94  96  95  97  98  99 100
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.