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I have a Javascript garbage collection/memory leak question. I'm using Chrome 28.0.1500.71 on OS X 10.8.4.

The following code never deallocates the space that was held by me and I'm clueless as to why.

var MyClass = function() {
    this.x = 1;

    var self = this;
    this.do_thing = function() {
        self.x++;
    };
};
MyClass.prototype.destroy = function() {
    delete this.do_thing;
};

var me = new MyClass();
me.do_thing();
me.destroy();
me = null;

// the MyClass object formerly known as 'me' is still allocated here
// (as evidenced by Chrome's heap profiler)

Chrome seems to keep the object created by the expression new MyClass() (the object that me pointed to before being set to null) in memory because it is referenced by self in the call to me.do_thing(). However, I would have thought the call to destroy(), which unsets me.do_thing would throw away the variables in the scope of the constructor (self in the new MyClass() call).

I have also tried using Underscore.JS's _.bind function but run into the same unresolved problem described here: Instances referenced by 'bound_this' only are not garbage collected.

share|improve this question
    
Please be precise and differentiate between "the global variable me" and "the MyClass object". The variable will surely remain in memory, but that's not a problem (and if it is, you can remove it from window, see simonleung's answer). Does Chrome indicate that the MyClass object is still alive? – delnan Jul 14 '13 at 20:02
    
Fair point; it's the MyClass object that was referenced by me that never gets deallocated. I updated the wording of my question to make this clearer. – soney Jul 14 '13 at 20:24
1  
Looks like there is a bug in V8, I opened an issue against this: code.google.com/p/v8/issues/detail?id=2791 – Yury Semikhatsky Jul 22 '13 at 10:14

I don't know why it is not garbage collected, but adding the destroy method to the instance instead of the prototype and setting self to null, will apparently work:

var MyClass = function() {
    this.x = 1;

    var self = this;
    this.do_thing = function() {
        self.x++;
    };

    this.destroy = function() {
        delete this.do_thing;
        self = null;
    };
};

var me = new MyClass();
me.do_thing();
me.destroy();
me = null;
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, although I'm still curious why self needs to be manually disposed of – soney Jul 14 '13 at 20:17
    
@soney it seems like it has something to do with the assignment of self.x in the line self.x++. If you change that line to return self.x, it also will get garbage collected. – basilikum Jul 14 '13 at 20:42

me is still a property of window object even you set it to null. Thus "me" is still in the memory.

I think this may help:

window.me = new MyClass();
me.do_thing();
delete window.me;
share|improve this answer
    
This snippet still leaves the MyClass object allocated in my browser. – soney Jul 14 '13 at 20:25

MyClass is a global variable. It is also a property of window object in browser environment. It is not a garbage so of couse it will not be collected.

share|improve this answer
    
While the MyClass function is taking up space, I'm referring to the object created by the expression new MyClass(). After me is set to null, it shouldn't have any more references to it and should be collected. – soney Jul 15 '13 at 17:51
    
the object will be collected by the gc, just not immediately. Try to refresh and genrate a new heap snapshot, you will not see any MyClass object. – simonleung Jul 16 '13 at 5:56

Looks like a bug. Btw me.destroy() is not necessary. It should be deleted without it.

share|improve this answer

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