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Differs from sugested solution above in that a list item can only appear once for each row.

This is for a booking system for my spa. Different employees can perform different treatments.

I have a List<List<int>>. These are therapists that can perform the treatment that is booked.

Each list (booking) contain a number of integers like this (these are therapists that can perform the booking):

{1, 3, 6},  //Booking 1
{1, 2, 6},  //Booking 2
{1},        //Booking 3
{2,3}       //Booking 4

I'd like to see all possible combinations where the number can only appear in one Place. For the above list the two possible ombinations would be:

6,2,1,3 or 3,6,1,2

That is for the first combination:

  • Booking 1: Therapist 6
  • Booking 2: Therapist 2
  • Booking 3: Therapist 1
  • Booking 4: Therapist 3

Hope this makes the question a Little bit clearer.

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marked as duplicate by Jeff Mercado, Prix, p.s.w.g, Jimbo, gustavohenke Jul 14 '13 at 22:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
And how did you come up with those two combinations? –  SamiHuutoniemi Jul 14 '13 at 17:26
    
@SamiHuutoniemi Well, I can't se any others, can you? –  ekenman Jul 14 '13 at 17:30
    
No, In that question the numbers can be in several places. So all combinations would be acceptable there. –  ekenman Jul 14 '13 at 17:34
    
The question doesn't make sense. The solution appears to be solvable by Distinct() but where does the order fit in? –  Gayot Fow Jul 14 '13 at 17:35
    
I'll try to edit the question to be more understandable. –  ekenman Jul 14 '13 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This solution is far from efficient:

    private static void Main()
    {
        List<List<int>> list = new List<List<int>>
            {
                new List<int>() {1, 3, 6}, //Booking 1
                new List<int>() {1, 2, 6}, //Booking 2
                new List<int>() {1}, //Booking 3
                new List<int>() {2, 3}
            };
        List<int[]> solutions = new List<int[]>();
        int[] solution = new int[list.Count];
        Solve(list, solutions, solution);
    }

    private static void Solve(List<List<int>> list, List<int[]> solutions, int[] solution)
    {
        if (solution.All(i => i != 0) && !solutions.Any(s => s.SequenceEqual(solution)))
            solutions.Add(solution);
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
        {
            if (solution[i] != 0)
                continue; // a caller up the hierarchy set this index to be a number
            for (int j = 0; j < list[i].Count; j++)
            {
                if (solution.Contains(list[i][j]))
                    continue;
                var solutionCopy = solution.ToArray();
                solutionCopy[i] = list[i][j];
                Solve(list, solutions, solutionCopy);
            }
        }
    }

It sounds like this can be solved more efficiently with Dynamic programming, but it's been a while since I took the relevant course.

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Thank you very much ytoledano! It's not so many so performance is not an issue. –  ekenman Jul 14 '13 at 18:16

Solve by recursion:

static IEnumerable<List<int>> GetCombinations(IEnumerable<List<int>> lists, IEnumerable<int> selected)
{
    if (lists.Any())
    {
        var remainingLists = lists.Skip(1);
        foreach (var item in lists.First().Where(x => !selected.Contains(x)))
            foreach (var combo in GetCombinations(remainingLists, selected.Concat(new int[] { item })))
                yield return combo;
    }
    else
    {
        yield return selected.ToList();
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<List<int>> lists = new List<List<int>>
    {
        new List<int> { 1, 3, 6 },
        new List<int> { 1, 2, 6 },
        new List<int> { 1 },
        new List<int> { 2, 3 }
    };

    var combos = GetCombinations(lists, new List<int>()).Distinct();

    foreach (var combo in combos)
        Console.WriteLine("{ " + string.Join(", ", combo.Select(x => x.ToString())) + " }");

    return;
}

Output:

{ 3, 6, 1, 2 }
{ 6, 2, 1, 3 }
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A simple way to look at this problem would be to choose from all combinations of the list of values, where every value in the combination is unique.

First figure out what all the combinations of values are.

public static IEnumerable<IList<T>> Combinations<T>(IEnumerable<IList<T>> collections)
{
    if (collections.Count() == 1)
    {
        foreach (var item in collections.Single())
            yield return new List<T> { item };
    }
    else if (collections.Count() > 1)
    {
        foreach (var item in collections.First())
        foreach (var tail in Combinations(collections.Skip(1)))
            yield return new[] { item }.Concat(tail).ToList();
    }
}

Then you need a way to determine if all the values are unique. A simple way to figure that out would be to check if the count of distinct values equals the count of all values.

public static bool AllUnique<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection)
{
    return collection.Distinct().Count() == collection.Count();
}

Once you have all that, put it all together.

var collections = new[]
{
    new List<int> { 1, 3, 6 },
    new List<int> { 1, 2, 6 },
    new List<int> { 1 },
    new List<int> { 2, 3 },
};
var results =
    from combination in Combinations(collections)
    where AllUnique(combination)
    select combination;
// results:
//  3,6,1,2
//  6,2,1,3
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