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In Scalaz in object Need I've found

def apply[A](a: => A) = {
  lazy val value0: A = a
  new Need[A] {
    def value = value0
  }
}

What's the difference between this and (more natural to me)

def apply[A](a: => A) = {
  new Need[A] {
    private lazy val value0: A = a
    def value = value0
  }
}

in terms of performance, generated code, etc.?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should generally prefer the second one in time- or space-critical applications. The reason is buried in the bytecode. Specifically, if we have

abstract class Foo { def value: Int }
class Bar {
  def out(i: => Int) = {
    lazy val v0 = i
    new Foo { def value = v0 }
  }
  def in(i: => Int) = new Foo {
    private lazy val v0 = i
    def value = v0
  }
}

then in the second case we add a private v0: Int and bitmap$0: Boolean to the bytecode, plus the standard lazy val accessors. In the first case, however, we instead add a v0$lzy$1: runtime.IntRef and a bitmap$0$1: runtime.VolatileByteRef to refer to an equivalent Int and Boolean created in the body of the out method. Thus, we have an extra layer of wrapping.

On my machine, the out version takes about 50% longer than the in version to create an object and retrieve value once.

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