Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Like the masochistic I am, I'm trying to learn all the matrix math behind creating modelview and perspective matrices so that I can write my own functions for generating them without the use of JS libraries.

I understand the concept of the matrices, but not how to actually generate them. I've been looking very closely at the glMatrix library, and I have the following questions:

1) What is going on in the following mat4.perspecive method?

/**
 * Generates a perspective projection matrix with the given bounds
 *
 * @param {mat4} out mat4 frustum matrix will be written into
 * @param {number} fovy Vertical field of view in radians
 * @param {number} aspect Aspect ratio. typically viewport width/height
 * @param {number} near Near bound of the frustum
 * @param {number} far Far bound of the frustum
 * @returns {mat4} out
 */
mat4.perspective = function (out, fovy, aspect, near, far) {
    var f = 1.0 / Math.tan(fovy / 2),
        nf = 1 / (near - far);
    out[0] = f / aspect;
    out[1] = 0;
    out[2] = 0;
    out[3] = 0;
    out[4] = 0;
    out[5] = f;
    out[6] = 0;
    out[7] = 0;
    out[8] = 0;
    out[9] = 0;
    out[10] = (far + near) * nf;
    out[11] = -1;
    out[12] = 0;
    out[13] = 0;
    out[14] = (2 * far * near) * nf;
    out[15] = 0;
    return out;
};

Specifically, I get what Math.tan(fovy / 2) is calculating, but why take the inverse of it? Likewise, why take the inverse of the difference between the near boundary and the far boundary? Also, why is out[11] set to -1 and what is the value stored in out[14] for?

2) The following mat4.lookAt method in the library is also confusing me:

/**
 * Generates a look-at matrix with the given eye position, focal point, 
 * and up axis
 *
 * @param {mat4} out mat4 frustum matrix will be written into
 * @param {vec3} eye Position of the viewer
 * @param {vec3} center Point the viewer is looking at
 * @param {vec3} up vec3 pointing up
 * @returns {mat4} out
 */
mat4.lookAt = function (out, eye, center, up) {
    var x0, x1, x2, y0, y1, y2, z0, z1, z2, len,
        eyex = eye[0],
        eyey = eye[1],
        eyez = eye[2],
        upx = up[0],
        upy = up[1],
        upz = up[2],
        centerx = center[0],
        centery = center[1],
        centerz = center[2];

    if (Math.abs(eyex - centerx) < GLMAT_EPSILON &&
        Math.abs(eyey - centery) < GLMAT_EPSILON &&
        Math.abs(eyez - centerz) < GLMAT_EPSILON) {
        return mat4.identity(out);
    }

    z0 = eyex - centerx;
    z1 = eyey - centery;
    z2 = eyez - centerz;

    len = 1 / Math.sqrt(z0 * z0 + z1 * z1 + z2 * z2);
    z0 *= len;
    z1 *= len;
    z2 *= len;

    x0 = upy * z2 - upz * z1;
    x1 = upz * z0 - upx * z2;
    x2 = upx * z1 - upy * z0;
    len = Math.sqrt(x0 * x0 + x1 * x1 + x2 * x2);
    if (!len) {
        x0 = 0;
        x1 = 0;
        x2 = 0;
    } else {
        len = 1 / len;
        x0 *= len;
        x1 *= len;
        x2 *= len;
    }

    y0 = z1 * x2 - z2 * x1;
    y1 = z2 * x0 - z0 * x2;
    y2 = z0 * x1 - z1 * x0;

    len = Math.sqrt(y0 * y0 + y1 * y1 + y2 * y2);
    if (!len) {
        y0 = 0;
        y1 = 0;
        y2 = 0;
    } else {
        len = 1 / len;
        y0 *= len;
        y1 *= len;
        y2 *= len;
    }

    out[0] = x0;
    out[1] = y0;
    out[2] = z0;
    out[3] = 0;
    out[4] = x1;
    out[5] = y1;
    out[6] = z1;
    out[7] = 0;
    out[8] = x2;
    out[9] = y2;
    out[10] = z2;
    out[11] = 0;
    out[12] = -(x0 * eyex + x1 * eyey + x2 * eyez);
    out[13] = -(y0 * eyex + y1 * eyey + y2 * eyez);
    out[14] = -(z0 * eyex + z1 * eyey + z2 * eyez);
    out[15] = 1;

    return out;
};

Similar to the mat4.perspecive method, why is the inverse of the length of the vector being calculated? Also, why is that value then multiplied by the z0, z1 and z2 values? The same thing is being done for the x0-x2 variables and the y0-y2 variables. Why? Lastly, what is the meaning of the values set for out[12]-out[14]?

3) Lastly, I have a few questions about the mat4.translate method. Specifically, I bought the book Professional WebGL Programming: Developing 3D Graphics for the Web, and it says that the following 4x4 matrix is used to translate a vertex:

1 0 0 x
0 1 0 y
0 0 1 z
0 0 0 1 

However, when I look at the following mat4.translate method in the glMatrix library, I see that out[12]-out[15] are set via some complex equations. Why are these values set at all?

/**
 * Translate a mat4 by the given vector
 *
 * @param {mat4} out the receiving matrix
 * @param {mat4} a the matrix to translate
 * @param {vec3} v vector to translate by
 * @returns {mat4} out
 */
mat4.translate = function (out, a, v) {
    var x = v[0], y = v[1], z = v[2],
        a00, a01, a02, a03,
        a10, a11, a12, a13,
        a20, a21, a22, a23;

    if (a === out) {
        out[12] = a[0] * x + a[4] * y + a[8] * z + a[12];
        out[13] = a[1] * x + a[5] * y + a[9] * z + a[13];
        out[14] = a[2] * x + a[6] * y + a[10] * z + a[14];
        out[15] = a[3] * x + a[7] * y + a[11] * z + a[15];
    } else {
        a00 = a[0]; a01 = a[1]; a02 = a[2]; a03 = a[3];
        a10 = a[4]; a11 = a[5]; a12 = a[6]; a13 = a[7];
        a20 = a[8]; a21 = a[9]; a22 = a[10]; a23 = a[11];

        out[0] = a00; out[1] = a01; out[2] = a02; out[3] = a03;
        out[4] = a10; out[5] = a11; out[6] = a12; out[7] = a13;
        out[8] = a20; out[9] = a21; out[10] = a22; out[11] = a23;

        out[12] = a00 * x + a10 * y + a20 * z + a[12];
        out[13] = a01 * x + a11 * y + a21 * z + a[13];
        out[14] = a02 * x + a12 * y + a22 * z + a[14];
        out[15] = a03 * x + a13 * y + a23 * z + a[15];
    }

    return out;
};

Thank you all for your time, and sorry for all the questions. I come from a JS background, not an OpenGL/3D programming background, so it's hard for me to understand the math behind all the matrices.

If there are any great resources out there that explain the math used for these equations/methods, then that would be great too. Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Specifically, I get what Math.tan(fovy / 2) is calculating, but why take the inverse of it?

Because the focal distance d comes from the formula

Math.tan(fovy / 2) = y / d

to get the focal length you need to multiply by

1 / Math.tan(fovy / 2)

why take the inverse of the difference between the near boundary and the far boundary? Also, why is out[11] set to -1 and what is the value stored in out[14] for?

You can project (x,y,z) into (x*d/z, y*d/z) using the focal distance d. This is enough but OpenGL requires a linear transformation to (x,y,z) such as the projection gives coordinates in [-1,1]. Such normalized coordinates simplify clipping and retain the z information used to remove hidden surfaces.

out[11] is set to -1 because there's no linear transformation that gives normalized coordinates unless a reflection is applied. This -1 causes the handedness of the system to be switched with normalized coordinates.

out[14] is used with out[10] to transform z from [-n -f] to [-1 1] after projection.

Similar to the mat4.perspecive method, why is the inverse of the length of the vector being calculated? Also, why is that value then multiplied by the z0, z1 and z2 values? The same thing is being done for the x0-x2 variables and the y0-y2 variables. Why?

To normalize the vectors x, y and z

what is the meaning of the values set for out[12]-out[14]?

A camera is composed of a base of vectors and a position. out[12]-out[14] apply an inverse translation to set the camera position.

However, when I look at the following mat4.translate method in the glMatrix library, I see that out[12]-out[15] are set via some complex equations. Why are these values set at all?

The equations look complex because it's a product of a translation matrix and an existing matrix a.

Professional WebGL Programming: Developing 3D Graphics for the Web

I don't know this book, it might explain some math but if you need detailed explanation you should consider Eric Lengyel's book that explains and derivates the important math used in 3d raster graphics.

share|improve this answer
    
a.lasram, thanks a lot for the detailed answer. Just to clarify, if Math.tan(fovy / 2) = y / d, then doesn't 1 / Math.tan(fovy / 2) equal d / y, not just d? Also, I'm sorry, but I'm having trouble understanding what d is. I was thinking that d was the same as z, but then d/z would always be 1. Could you please explain what I'm missing here? Also, what did you mean by the following: A camera is composed of a base of vectors and a position? Thanks a lot. That book you suggested sounds interesting, but according to some reviews, I'm worried about it causing more confusion. –  HartleySan Jul 15 '13 at 3:53
    
"d = y / Math.tan(fovy / 2)" this means that the factor you put in the matrix is "1 / Math.tan(fovy / 2)". when you multiply the matrix with a vector "y / Math.tan(fovy / 2)" will appear. d is the focal length. it's a constant representing the distance from the viewer to the near plane. The camera space is defined by an affine frame: the three basis vectors x,y,z and a position "eye". I highly recommend the book: not all books describe how to obtain these matrices step by step in the context of OpenGL –  a.lasram Jul 15 '13 at 19:28
    
I'm still a little confused, but you have sold me on the book. Also, thanks a lot for your explanations. I understood most of them, but I guess it's just one of those things that's really hard to explain. Thanks. –  HartleySan Jul 15 '13 at 19:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.