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So pretty much, I am just learning how to allocate memory and work with memory in C. I am using gcc to compile and nano as my editor, here is my code:

   #include <stdio.h>
   #include <stdlib.h>

   static int *ip, i; 
   main (){
       ip=(int *)malloc(10*sizeof(int));
           for(i=0;i<10;++i){
               scanf("%d",ip++);
           }
       free(ip);
   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
   }

When I call the compiler I compile with: cd Desktop/C/learn; gcc -W -Werror malloc.c -o run; ./run

The program successfully compiles but after the for statement is finished and free (ip) pointer is called the compiler returns this:

*** glibc detected *** ./run: free(): invalid pointer: 0x088ec030 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x75ee2)[0xb75e9ee2]
./run[0x80484ce]
/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xf3)[0xb758d4d3]
./run[0x80483d1]
======= Memory map: ========
08048000-08049000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 23330986   /home/phox/Desktop/run
08049000-0804a000 r--p 00000000 08:06 23330986   /home/phox/Desktop/run
0804a000-0804b000 rw-p 00001000 08:06 23330986   /home/phox/Desktop/run
088ec000-0890d000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0          [heap]
b753f000-b755b000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 14418881   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
b755b000-b755c000 r--p 0001b000 08:06 14418881   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
b755c000-b755d000 rw-p 0001c000 08:06 14418881   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
b7573000-b7574000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
b7574000-b7717000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 14418860   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
b7717000-b7719000 r--p 001a3000 08:06 14418860   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
b7719000-b771a000 rw-p 001a5000 08:06 14418860   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc-2.15.so
b771a000-b771d000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
b7731000-b7735000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
b7735000-b7736000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0          [vdso]
b7736000-b7756000 r-xp 00000000 08:06 14418840   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
b7756000-b7757000 r--p 0001f000 08:06 14418840   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
b7757000-b7758000 rw-p 00020000 08:06 14418840   /lib/i386-linux-gnu/ld-2.15.so
bff5b000-bff7c000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0          [stack]
Aborted

I am wondering why this is happening and how can I get around this. Is my method not friendly to memory? What is going on here?

How can I re-write the code to make it work?

I am not learning from any book or tutorial or anything. The way I learn a language is read the source code of the compiler or IDE, or the way the language is written -- and go from there. So I don't really have any reference to turn to. Anyone know how to fix this?

Thank a lot! ~ Phox

share|improve this question
7  
You need to free the original pointer. You have incremented the pointer 10 times. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 14 '13 at 21:18
1  
instead of ip++ say ip + i. –  Kerrek SB Jul 14 '13 at 21:18
    
You might like to know that your style of writing C is from about 1970. It would look rather different in modern C. –  Kerrek SB Jul 14 '13 at 21:25
1  
Is the information about you editor being nano is relevant for your question? –  ouah Jul 14 '13 at 21:30
1  
"questions must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved"... –  user529758 Jul 14 '13 at 21:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that your pointer ip is not the same as it was in the first place of the malloc. You can fix it by making temporary pointer. example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static int *ip, i, *tmp_ip; 
int main (){
   tmp_ip=(int *)malloc(10*sizeof(int));
   ip = tmp_ip; // making ip to point the same place as tmp_ip.
   for(i=0;i<10;++i){
     scanf("%d",ip++);
   }
   free(tmp_ip);
   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you need to save your original pointer in order to free it:

  #include <stdio.h>
  #include <stdlib.h>

   void main (){
       int *ip, i; 
       ip=(int *)malloc(10*sizeof(int));
       if (ip == NULL) {
         perror ("Memory allocation error");
         return;
       }
       current_p = ip;
       for(i=0;i<10;++i){
           // increment another pointer; don't modify original pointer
           scanf("%d",current_p++);
       }
       free(ip);
   }

Or, equivalently:

  #include <stdio.h>
  #include <stdlib.h>

   void main (){
       int *ip, *current_p, i; 
       ip=(int *)malloc(10*sizeof(int));
       if (ip == NULL) {
         perror ("Memory allocation error");
         return;
       }
       for(i=0;i<10;++i){
           // index; don't modify original pointer
           scanf("%d",ip[i]);
       }
       free(ip);
   }
share|improve this answer
2  
People, even 30k users don't give a fook about the return type of main? –  user529758 Jul 14 '13 at 21:42
1  
Is null a C99 (or later) addition to C? Because for C90, I only know NULL (or the possibility to use 0 or (void*)0 directly). And even in C++11 where a built-in constant exists, it's nullptr, not null. –  celtschk Jul 14 '13 at 22:07
    
@celtschk - simple typo: sorry –  paulsm4 Jul 14 '13 at 22:50

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