Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder how to stop the propagation of all types of events when they reach a certain element.

I have thought

function stop(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
}
function stopEvents(el){
    var events = ['click', 'mousemove', ...];
    for(var i=0; i<events.length; ++i){
        el.addEventListener(events[i], stop, false);
    }
}

Is there a smarter way?

It seems that my code works, but I would like a code that doesn't require a list of all possible events.

Because if I write a GreaseMonkey module which other people can use to add content to pages, I don't want events generated inside that content to trigger page's event listeners (assuming they don't use capture). Actually I solved it using iframes, but the question remains for academic purposes

share|improve this question
    
But why ??????? –  adeneo Jul 15 '13 at 0:06
    
That looks fine, does it work? –  elclanrs Jul 15 '13 at 0:06
    
Listing out all the events might take a while. You should just automate that with JavaScript. –  Shawn31313 Jul 15 '13 at 0:07
    
@Shawn31313 How can I get a list of all events? –  Oriol Jul 15 '13 at 0:08
    
@adeneo Because if I write a GreaseMonkey module which other people can use to add content to pages, I don't want events generated inside that content to trigger page's event listeners (assuming they don't use capture). Actually I solved it using iframes, but the question remains for academic purposes. –  Oriol Jul 15 '13 at 0:12
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
function stop(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
}
function stopEvents(el){
    for(var key in window) {
        if (key.indexOf("on") == 0) {
            el.addEventListener(key.substr(2), stop, false);
        }
    }
}

This is how you could get all of the events.

This could cause some issue though. For example, if you add another key into the window object that starts with on, it will also be considered an "event".

You also have to consider that the window object is large.

I would just use your code. The full list of events would be:

Google Chrome

["deviceorientation", "transitionend", "webkittransitionend", "webkitanimationstart", "webkitanimationiteration", "webkitanimationend", "search", "reset", "waiting", "volumechange", "unload", "timeupdate", "suspend", "submit", "storage", "stalled", "select", "seeking", "seeked", "scroll", "resize", "ratechange", "progress", "popstate", "playing", "play", "pause", "pageshow", "pagehide", "online", "offline", "mousewheel", "mouseup", "mouseover", "mouseout", "mousemove", "mousedown", "message", "loadstart", "loadedmetadata", "loadeddata", "load", "keyup", "keypress", "keydown", "invalid", "input", "hashchange", "focus", "error", "ended", "emptied", "durationchange", "drop", "dragstart", "dragover", "dragleave", "dragenter", "dragend", "drag", "dblclick", "contextmenu", "click", "change", "canplaythrough", "canplay", "blur", "beforeunload", "abort"]

FireFox

["SearchSubmit", "mouseenter", "mouseleave", "afterprint", "beforeprint", "beforeunload", "hashchange", "message", "offline", "online", "popstate", "pagehide", "pageshow", "resize", "unload", "devicemotion", "deviceorientation", "deviceproximity", "userproximity", "devicelight", "abort", "blur", "canplay", "canplaythrough", "change", "click", "contextmenu", "dblclick", "drag", "dragend", "dragenter", "dragleave", "dragover", "dragstart", "drop", "durationchange", "emptied", "ended", "error", "focus", "input", "invalid", "keydown", "keypress", "keyup", "load", "loadeddata", "loadedmetadata", "loadstart", "mousedown", "mousemove", "mouseout", "mouseover", "mouseup", "mozfullscreenchange", "mozfullscreenerror", "mozpointerlockchange", "mozpointerlockerror", "pause", "play", "playing", "progress", "ratechange", "reset", "scroll", "seeked", "seeking", "select", "show", "stalled", "submit", "suspend", "timeupdate", "volumechange", "waiting", "wheel", "copy", "cut", "paste", "beforescriptexecute", "afterscriptexecute"]
share|improve this answer
    
Did you try that? Does the document hold a list of events, I was under the impression you'd get stuff like .appendChild, .write etc. back, i.e. the methods accessible on the document level ? –  adeneo Jul 15 '13 at 0:14
    
What the heck, I tried it for you -> jsfiddle.net/bxCLH –  adeneo Jul 15 '13 at 0:14
    
It seems to grab the functions named on* as well. –  mvw Jul 15 '13 at 0:15
    
@mvw Thats true. And i'm sorry, i need to update my code. I need to use window to get all the events. –  Shawn31313 Jul 15 '13 at 0:16
    
@adeneo the document object does hold a few events like onclick, oninput...but the window object contains the full list. –  Shawn31313 Jul 15 '13 at 0:18
show 5 more comments

Is there a chance for css on disabled areas?

pointer-events : none;
share|improve this answer
    
That's an interesting CSS property which I didn't know. I've tried *{pointer-events:none} #el, #el *{pointer-events:auto} but doesn't work because with pointer-events:none "the element is never the target of mouse events; however, mouse events may target its descendant elements if those descendants have pointer-events set to some other value. In these circumstances, mouse events will trigger event listeners on this parent element as appropriate on their way to/from the descendant during the event capture/bubble phases." developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/pointer-events –  Oriol Jul 15 '13 at 14:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.