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So essentially, my while loop will evaluate the first two conditions when the length condition is not present; however when I had the length condition, the loop only evaluates that condition. I'm not sure what's wrong.

input=keyboard.next();
while (input.charAt(0)!='F'&&input.charAt(0)!='K'&&input.length()>1) { 
    System.out.println("invalid");
    input=keyboard.next();
}

If I'm missing something very obvious (which I probably am), I'm sorry for taking up your time, but thanks anyway for taking the time to look at this question.

I just moved my code to a new file, and it's still not working. I don't understand why I'm being downvoted as I'm just asking a question and have yet to get an answer.

import java.util.Scanner;
public class test123444 {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Scanner keyboard=new Scanner(System.in);

    String input;


    input=keyboard.next();
  while (input.charAt(0)!='F'&&input.charAt(0)!='K'&&input.length()>1) { 
System.out.println("invalid");
input=keyboard.next();
  }
}


}
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by jh314, Luiggi Mendoza, Tilak, Code Lღver, Uwe Plonus Jul 15 '13 at 6:23

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Your code executes every time length > 1 you're saying? Just trying to clarify. –  Kon Jul 15 '13 at 2:57
1  
@Nambari I assume input is a String he's calling charAt() on. –  Kon Jul 15 '13 at 2:58
    
no no my code surpasses the loop when the length condition is present and I input a single character value(doesn't matter what value), but when I don't have the length condition, the f and k conditions work. –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 2:59
1  
Well when you input a single character your code SHOULD "surpass" meaning skip over the loop, because a single character does not have length greater than 1. –  Kon Jul 15 '13 at 3:00
2  
Edit your question and show more code. Looks like the problem is somewhere else. This code works as expected. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 15 '13 at 3:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As Kon implies in the comments above, what you need to write is:

while (input.charAt(0) != 'F' && input.charAt(0) != 'K' || input.length() > 1) {

That is — you want your loop to run if input has more than one character or if its first character is neither 'F' nor 'K'. Your current code will enter the loop only if input has more than one character and its first character is neither 'F' nor 'K'.

Or, better yet:

while (! input.equals("F") && ! input.equals("K")) {
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:13
    
apparently I lost 6 ranking by asking this question and following up with comments. If I could upvote your answer I would, thanks –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:16
1  
+1 First answer to actually be helpful. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 15 '13 at 3:17
1  
@gucci Well if you can't upvote you can still accept his answer –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 15 '13 at 3:22
1  
@gucci: Regarding the downvotes . . . I think people were confused about what you were asking. (It seems that English isn't your native language, and that you're new to Java.) One of the criteria for downvotes is "not clear", which for many people this was. In the future, I suggest that you post a short complete program that demonstrates your problem. In this case, your posted code-snippet depended on code that you didn't post, and it wasn't very clear what you wanted it to do. With a little bit of work, you could have created something clearer that could stand on its own. –  ruakh Jul 15 '13 at 3:24

In your while loop, you specify the input.length() > 1 condition. Since you are using keyboard.next() to grab your next input, I assume that input will only have a length of 1. That's why it works if you remove that test case.

If you want to loop through strings that the user can input into the console via, use Scanner. You can use it by making it listen for console input like this: new Scanner(System.in). Use scanner.next() to wait for input.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure that keyboard is a Scanner. You've misunderstood the problem. –  ruakh Jul 15 '13 at 3:03
    
I'm a little confused by what you mean to do with the scanner.next() (have not used that before) –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:03
    
my problem is, when all three conditions are in the code, it only evaluates the length condition, not the F or K condition –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:04
    
-1: If keyboard is a java.util.Scanner object, then this problem never arise. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 15 '13 at 3:04
1  
If you didn't know that, then you should start posting a comment instead of answer (otherwise I would have posted an answer :] ). –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 15 '13 at 3:06

The problem is that input.length() > 1 is always false, which makes the test condition in your while loop false (for &&, if one condition is false, then the whole thing is false)

Thus, if you leave input.length()>1 in your condition, no matter whether if input.charAt(0)!='F' is true/false or input.charAt(0)!='K' is true/false, the thrid condition will be false and your loop body never executes.

share|improve this answer
    
but when I input a 1 char symbol, it has a length which is true, so shouldn't it repeat the loop? –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:01
    
1 > 1 is certainly false... –  jh314 Jul 15 '13 at 3:03
    
even as I have switched the > symbol to the other way around, It still does not work but the thing is I only want a 1 char input, not a 2 char so while my input is greater than 1, I want a new input –  gucci Jul 15 '13 at 3:08
    
1 < 1 is also certainly false... –  jh314 Jul 15 '13 at 3:09
    
@gucci As Luiggi mentioned you really need to provide more code, an example of input and what you expect the results to be. As stated there is plenty of ambiguous information. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 15 '13 at 3:10

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