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Premise

I recently ran into a bug in a select statement in my code. It was fairly trivial to fix after I realized what was going on, but I'm interested in finding a way to make sure a similar bug doesn't happen again.

Here's an example of an offending query:

select
  the,
  quick,
  brown
  fox,
  jumped,
  over,
  the,
  lazy,
  dog
from table_name;

What I had intended was:

select
  the,
  quick,
  brown,
  fox,
  jumped,
  over,
  the,
  lazy,
  dog
from table_name;

For those who don't see it, a comma is missing after brown in the former. This causes the column to be aliased, because the as keyword is not required. So, what you get in the result is:

  the,
  quick,
  fox,
  jumped,
  over,
  the,
  lazy,
  dog

...with all the values of brown in a column named fox. This can be noticed pretty easily for a short query like the above (especially when each column has very different values), but where it came up was in a fairly complicated query with mostly integer columns like this:

select
  foo,
  bar,
  baz,
  another_table.quux,
  a1,
  a2,
  a3,
  a4,
  a5,
  a6,
  a7,
  a8,
  a9,
  a10,
  a11,
  a12,
  a13,
  a14,
  a15,
  a16,
  b1,
  b2,
  b3,
  b7,
  b8,
  b9,
  b10,
  b11,
  b12,
  b13,
  b14,
  b18,
  b19,
  b20,
  b21,
  c1,
  c2,
  c3,
  c4,
  c5,
  c6,
  c7,
  c8
from table_name
join another_table on table_name.foo_id = another_table.id
where
  blah = 'blargh'
-- many other things here
;

Even with better column names, the values are all very similar. If I were to miss a comma after b11 (for example) and then all of the b11 values get called b12, it's pretty unfortunate when we run the data through our processing pipeline (which depends on these column names in the result). Normally, I'd do select * from table_name, but what we needed required us to be a little more selective than that.

Question

What I'm looking for is a strategy to stop this from happening again.

Is there a way to require as when aliasing columns? Or a trick of writing things to make it give an error? (For example, in C-like languages, I started writing 1 == foo instead of foo == 1 to cause a compile error when I accidentally left out an equal sign, making it the invalid 1 = foo instead of foo = 1.)

I use vim normally, so I can use hlsearch to highlight commas just so I can eyeball it. However, I have to write queries in other environments quite often, including a proprietary interface in which I can't do something like this easily.

Thanks for your help!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One thing that I've done before is to move the commas to the beginning of the line. This allows some benefits. First, you can instantly see if there are any commas missing. Second, you can add a new column at the end without having to modify the previously last line.

Missing:

select
  the
, quick
, brown
  fox
, jumped
, over
, the
, lazy
, dog
from table_name;

Not missing:

select
  the
, quick
, brown
, fox
, jumped
, over
, the
, lazy
, dog
from table_name;
share|improve this answer
    
I was going to write this in my question, actually -- but I thought I'd leave it out to see if people had better suggestions. Any way to allow it before the? Or is that just something to live with? –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 16:56
    
Something will have to be different at one end of the collection or the other. If you're desperate to have a comma be immediately after the select then you could move "the" to just after select, or have a dummy constant like "select 1". –  scwagner Nov 19 '09 at 16:59
    
It's all good -- I'd be fine with a missing comma. I was hoping there'd be a way of always having trailing commas, like in Python or Ruby. (You can write [1, 2, 3, 4,] and then that problem goes away, which is wonderfull when you just want to comment something out for a second.) –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 17:03
    
Oops... .s/full/ful/ –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 17:04
    
This is an approach I've always used for the reason that it's far simpler to both add and remove fields –  Brett Ryan Mar 6 '12 at 11:23

You could wrap your SQL calls in a function that would either:

  1. Iterate over the columns in the result set, checking for column names containing a space

or

  1. Accept both the SQL statement and an integer intended number of columns, then check the result set to make sure the number of columns matches what you intended.
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I have the same problem that you do. I have used make and the perl script to do a "lint" like check on my code for a long time. It has helped prevent a number of mistakes like this. In the makefile I have:

lint_code:
    perl lint_code.pl <file_1.php

The perl file is:

$st = 0;
$line_no = 0;
while (<>)
{
   $line_no++;
   $st = 1 if ( /start-sql/ );
   $st = 0 if ( /end-sql/ );
   $st = 2 if ( $st == 1 && /select/ );
   $st = 3 if ( $st == 2 && /from/ );
   if ( $st == 2 && /^[ \t]+[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9]*[ \t*]$/ )
   {
      if ( ! /select/ )
      {
         printf ( "Possible Error: Line: $line_no\n" );
      }
   }
}

I surround my select statements with comments //start-sql and //end-sql. I hope this helps. I have changed the regular expression to reflect how you formatted your SQL as I have been using a different format (with the commas in the front).

As a part of my build/test process I run a set of checks over the code. This is a less than perfect solution but it has helped me.

(I am having a little difficulty with the stackoverflow rich text editor changing my code. Hopefully I will learn how to properly use it.)

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Thanks for sharing. I'm not sure how often I'd be able to fit that into my workflow, but I definitely appreciate it. Just out of curiosity, how do you format your SQL statements? I try to write mine so I can easily move chunks around, but yet still have it be readable. –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 17:08

write a comma before the name

first
,short
,medium
,longlonglong
,...

vs

first,
short,
medium,
longlonglong,
...

also makes it really easy to see the list of sql select arguments

works in any IDE :)

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If you have columns with similar names, distinguished only by suffix numbers, you've already lost. You have a bad database design.

And most modern developers use SQL generators or ORMs these days, instead of writing this "assembly language" SQL.

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1  
It's something I came into ownership of, not something I designed. Definitely something I'd like to change, though. –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 16:54
    
Regarding the second comment, I normally use an ORM layer. However, there's still plenty of complex cases where writing a succint select query wins over ORM. –  Benjamin Oakes Nov 19 '09 at 16:58
    
I'm not blaming you. I'm just giving you direction if you didn't already have it. :) –  Randal Schwartz Nov 21 '09 at 2:24

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