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I am at an intermediate level in Algorithms. Recently when I was comparing different sorting algorithms this thing stuck to me.

How do you compare different sorting algorithms when the data is rather incoming than already being present?

I have compared a few myself but not very sure if it is the right approach.

Insertion Sort : As the name itself suggests, it presents a nice solution to the problem with O(n^2) complexity.

Heap Sort : The technique is to build the heap for each data item pushed. It corresponds to a sift-up operation with O(logn) complexity and then exchange the first element with the last element and Heapify to restore the heap properties. Heapify is again O(logn) so the overall complexity is O(n logn logn). But if we have all the data items present with us already it is only O(n logn) because we are doing only Heapify operation on the data items after we have built the heap.

Selection sort : It needs all the data items before sorting, so I assume there is no solution to our problem using selection sort.

Tree sort : The dominant step in this technique is to build a tree which has a Worst-case time complexity of O(n^2). And then an in-order traversal would do.

I am not very sure about the other algorithms.

I am posting this question as I am looking for a complete hold on these sorting techniques. Pardon me if you find any discrepancies in either my question or my comparisons.

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What operations do you want to support on the sorted data at each step? If you know something about how you'll use the data, you might be able to optimize the sorting. –  templatetypedef Jul 15 '13 at 6:26
    
I just want to keep it sorted. This question is purely out of theoretical curiosity. –  user1726707 Jul 15 '13 at 6:28
    
Your analysis of heap sort is wrong. Adding a new element to a heap is amortized O(1) to add an element to the end, then O(log(n)) for it to "fall down" to the right place. That leads to O(n log(n)). Quick sort also keeps the same average (and unfortunately worst case) performance but without the possibility of a painful reallocate on pushing a new element into the data structure. –  btilly Jul 15 '13 at 6:37
    
Building a heap doesn't keep the data sorted. It just ensures that the lowest item is at the top of the heap. If you want to keep the data sorted, you probably want something like a balanced binary tree, which has O(log n) insertion. –  Jim Mischel Jul 30 '13 at 17:03

2 Answers 2

Building a heap one item at a time doesn't add any extra complexity (and your O(n log n log n) doesn't make sense to me at all). In fact, the normal way to build a heap is to add one item at a time to the heap anyway. That is to say, even if you have all your items available to start with, you start by building a heap of the first two, then adding the third, the fourth, and so on. If you're receiving the items one at a time, it doesn't cause any extra work at all. It ends up O(N log N), just like always.

Just to be clear: the swapping an item to the first position and then sifting into the tree is not for when you're adding items -- it's for when you're removing items. That is to say: when you're done inserting all the items into the heap, you're reading to produce sorted output. You do that by swapping the item at the base of the heap (i.e., first item in the array) to the end of the array, then taking the item that started out at the end of the array, and sifting it upward in the heap until the heap property is restored.

When you're adding new items to the heap, you add them at the end, then sift them downward to restore the heap property. In the typical case where they're already all available, you do that by starting at the beginning of the array, and having a partition between items that form a heap, and items that are still just a jumbled mess. To build all the items into a heap, you move that partition over one item, sift that item down to where it belongs, and repeat. With an "online" version that doesn't have all the data immediately available, all that changes is that after you sift an item into the heap, you have to wait for the next item to arrive before you sift it into the heap (where you'd normally insert the next item immediately).

Building a tree is only O(N2) if 1) the items arrive perfectly ordered, and 2) you don't realize that, and 3) you don't re-balance the tree as you build it. If the items are in fairly random order to start with, even without balancing, your complexity will be close to O(N log N). In a typical case of building something like a Red-Black or AVL tree, it'll remain O(N log N) even if the items are in order (though it would be O(N log N) with lower constants if they arrive in more or less random order instead of sorted). Likewise, if you use a B-tree, you'll get O(N log N) complexity, even if the data arrive in order.

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Thanks for making things clear mate! I had only seen heap-building as shown here Build-heap. Now I realize that it can be done one at a time also. –  user1726707 Jul 15 '13 at 7:55
    
@user1726707: See heapify (line 37) at: ideone.com/pAowGb –  Jerry Coffin Jul 15 '13 at 8:06
    
Actually, if you have all the items available at one time you can create a heap in O(n), not O(n log n). See homepages.ius.edu/rwisman/C455/html/notes/Chapter6/BldHeap.htm –  Jim Mischel Jul 30 '13 at 17:00

Insertion Sort : As the name itself suggests, it presents a nice solution to the problem with O(n^2) complexity.

I agree, not all that great, in either case.

Heap Sort : The technique is to build the heap for each data item pushed. It corresponds to a sift-up operation with O(logn) complexity and then exchange the first element with the last element and Heapify to restore the heap properties. Heapify is again O(logn) so the overall complexity is O(n logn logn). But if we have all the data items present with us already it is only O(n logn) because we are doing only Heapify operation on the data items after we have built the heap.

You can do this with a min-heap Binary tree, but if you're using an array, this may be difficult.

Selection sort : It needs all the data items before sorting, so I assume there is no solution to our problem using selection sort.

Terrible in either case.

Tree sort : The dominant step in this technique is to build a tree which has a Worst-case time complexity of O(n^2). And then an in-order traversal would do.

O(nlogn) if you use radix sort. See heap sort comments about array.

Other sorts:
Counting sort: Terrible if you don't know the data before hand. Since you really don't know how much space you need before hand.

Radix Sort: Still amazing, will be the best sorting algorithm in either case. Especially when you do it with a byte sort. All you do is input into a histogram as the data comes in, then store it into a temp linked list. Then do the radix sort afterwards.

Bucket Sort: Can go either way, much better than counting sort, not as good as radix sort.

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Neither radix sort nor bucket sort are always better than counting sort, it all depends on the data. And I don't see any mention of the type of data in the question, so you really should mention that all of your other sorts only works on integral types. Sure it can be hacked to work on a byte level, thus any type, but I imagine it could severely impact performance if you were to do this. –  Dukeling Jul 15 '13 at 8:42
    
With most practical applications it is always better. Since you can sort any sized integer/float in 2 passes, and long long/doubles in 4 passes, makes it pretty convincing. Check out my implementation of this: stackoverflow.com/questions/17637272/… to see how I did it. –  Kevin Melkowski Jul 16 '13 at 2:41
    
Yeah I hacked it to work on the byte level for any type, and the performance only went up. –  Kevin Melkowski Jul 16 '13 at 2:42

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