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In Python you have two fine ways to repeat some action more than once. One of them is while loop and the other - for loop. So let's have a look on two simple pieces of code:

for i in range(n):
    do_sth()

And the other:

i = 0
while i < n:
    do_sth()
    i += 1

My question is which of them is better. Of course, the first one, which is very common in documentation examples and various pieces of code you could find around the Internet, is much more elegant and shorter, but on the other hand it creates a completely useless list of integers just to loop over them. Isn't it a waste of memory, especially as far as big numbers of iterations are concerned?

So what do you think, which way is better?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

but on the other hand it creates a completely useless list of integers just to loop over them. Isn't it a waste of memory, especially as far as big numbers of iterations are concerned?

That is what xrange(n) is for. It avoids creating a list of numbers, and instead just provides an iterator object.

In Python 3, xrange() was renamed to range() - if you want a list, you have to specifically request it via list(range(n)).

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In your last sentence, I think you mean list(range(n)) –  SethMMorton Jul 15 '13 at 6:30
    
I'd like to note that while less memory-efficient (without xrange), the for loop is much faster, there's no extra comparison and addition. –  Pavel Anossov Jul 15 '13 at 6:31
    
Good to know all that! Thank you very much. :) –  Sventimir Jul 15 '13 at 11:03

This is lighter weight than xrange (and the while loop) since it doesn't even need to create the int objects. It also works equally well in Python2 and Python3

from itertools import repeat
for i in repeat(None, 10):
    do_sth()
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It requires importing itertools on the other hand, which is a bit inconvenient. Amber's answer looks better. –  Sventimir Jul 15 '13 at 11:05
    
It's inconvenient for code golf. Not sure why people think import is some sort of problem. Besides real programs have a bunch of imports and itertools has lots of stuff you should be using anyway. –  gnibbler Jul 15 '13 at 11:09
    
Well, I assume that when you could do something with the core language equally good as with a module, then why import? Itertools is extremely useful for certain purposes, true, but I can imagine a lot of Python scripts working nicely without it. That's why it's a module and not core Python. :) –  Sventimir Jul 15 '13 at 13:06
    
for i in xrange(n): is also more idiomatic, which is honestly far more important than an import either way. –  Amber Jul 15 '13 at 15:13

The fundamental difference in most programming languages is that unless the unexpected happens a for loop will always repeat n times then finish with a while loop it may repeat 0 times, 1, more or even forever, depending on a given condition which is always true at the start of each loop and always false on exiting the loop, (for completeness a do ... while loop, (or repeat until), for languages that have it, always executes at least once and does not guarantee the condition on the first execution).

So the answer to your question is 'it all depends on what you are trying to do'!

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