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I have an application where I am looking for a text file and if there are any changes made to the file I am using the OnChanged eventhandler to handle the event. I am using the NotifyFilters.LastWriteTime but still the event is getting fired twice. Here is the code.

public void Initialize()
{
   FileSystemWatcher _fileWatcher = new FileSystemWatcher();
  _fileWatcher.Path = "C:\\Folder";
  _fileWatcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastWrite;
  _fileWatcher.Filter = "Version.txt";
  _fileWatcher.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnChanged);
  _fileWatcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
}

private void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
   .......
}

In my case the OnChanged is called twice, when I change the text file version.txt and save it.

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4  
All these up-votes, all these potential answers, and not a single one is marked as the winning answer?? –  Brett Rigby Oct 18 '13 at 9:53

13 Answers 13

I am afraid that this is a well-known bug/feature of the FileSystemWatcher class. This is from the documentation of the class:

You may notice in certain situations that a single creation event generates multiple Created events that are handled by your component. For example, if you use a FileSystemWatcher component to monitor the creation of new files in a directory, and then test it by using Notepad to create a file, you may see two Created events generated even though only a single file was created. This is because Notepad performs multiple file system actions during the writing process. Notepad writes to the disk in batches that create the content of the file and then the file attributes. Other applications may perform in the same manner. Because FileSystemWatcher monitors the operating system activities, all events that these applications fire will be picked up.

Now this bit of text is about the Created event, but the same thing applies to other file events as well. In some applications you might be able to get around this by using the NotifyFilter property, but my experience is says that sometimes you have to do some manual duplicate filtering (hacks) as well.

A while ago I bookedmarked a page with a few FileSystemWatcher tips. You might want to check it out.

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4  
Nice, thanks for posting the tips. Good stuff. +1 from me. –  Wil P Nov 19 '09 at 17:50
    
+1 I agree, in some cases it's necessary to do some 'smart filtering'. –  René Sep 5 '12 at 13:09
    
@Jørn Schou-Rode Please undelete this answer of yours, thank you. –  Shimmy Dec 2 '12 at 8:17
    
@Shimmy Agreed, done. –  Jørn Schou-Rode Jan 22 '13 at 14:43
    
Raymond Chen has just blogged about this: Why does saving a file in Notepad fire multiple FindFirstChangeNotification events? –  Cody Gray May 21 at 12:29

I've "fixed" that problem using the following strategy in my delegate:

// fsw_ is the FileSystemWatcher instance used by my application.

private void OnDirectoryChanged(...)
{
   try
   {
      fsw_.EnableRaisingEvents = false;

      /* do my stuff once */
   }

   finally
   {
      fsw_.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
   }
}
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1  
Thanks. This solved the issue for me as well. –  Dean Jan 14 '11 at 20:16
3  
I tried that and it worked if I modified one file at a time but if I modified two files at a time ( like copy 1.txt and 2.txt to copy of 1.txt and copy of 2.txt ) it would only raise one event not two as expected. –  Christopher Painter Nov 16 '11 at 20:34
1  
@ChristopherPainter Davids approach works for me if I just switch 'EnableRaisingEvents' on and off before doing my slightly time consuming read operations. You might try this as well. –  Andreas Walter Jan 13 '12 at 13:22
1  
It's been a couple months but I think what I ended up doing is having the event call a method that puts business logic inside of a lock statement. That way if I get extra events they queue up until it's their turn and there's nothing for them to do since the previous iteration took care of everything. –  Christopher Painter Jan 13 '12 at 14:02
1  
This appears to fix the issue, but it does not. If another process is making changes you might lose them, the reason it appears to work is because the IO of the other process is async, and you disable monitoring till you are done your processing, thus creating a race condition with other events that might be of interest. That is why @ChristopherPainter observed his issue. –  Jf Beaulac Jan 10 at 19:04

Any duplicated OnChanged events from the FileSystemWatcher can be detected and discarded by checking the File.GetLastWriteTime timestamp on the file in question. Like so:

DateTime lastRead = DateTime.MinValue;

void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs a)
{
    DateTime lastWriteTime = File.GetLastWriteTime(uri);
    if (lastWriteTime != lastRead)
    {
        doStuff();
        lastRead = lastWriteTime;
    }
    // else discard the (duplicated) OnChanged event
}
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Here is my solution which helped me to stop the event being raised twice:

watcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.FileName | NotifyFilters.Size;

Here I have set the NotifyFilter property with only Filename and size.
watcher is my object of FileSystemWatcher. Hope this will help.

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This solution worked for me. –  Rhyous Nov 27 '12 at 19:52
5  
Also, in Notepad, I created a file with four characters: abcd in it. I then opened a new instance of Notepad and entered the same four characters. I chose File | Save As and chose the same file. The file is identical and the size and filename do not change, since the file has the same four letters, so this doesn't fire. –  Rhyous Nov 27 '12 at 20:19
8  
It's possible that a genuine change could be made which doesn't alter the size of the file, therefore this technique would fail in that situation. –  Lee Grissom Aug 7 '13 at 1:14
    
I would guess it is a fairly common case where you know that any meaningful change will modify the file size (for example, my case was appending to a log file). While anyone who uses this solution should be aware of (and document) that assumption, this was exactly what I needed. –  GrandOpener Mar 3 at 5:23

My scenario is that I have a virtual machine with a Linux server in it. I am developing files on the Windows host. When I change something in a folder on the host I want all the changes to be uploaded, synced onto the virtual server via Ftp. This is how I do eliminate the duplicate change event when I write to a file ( which flags the folder containing the file to be modified as well ) :

private Hashtable fileWriteTime = new Hashtable();

private void fsw_sync_Changed(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    string path = e.FullPath.ToString();
    string currentLastWriteTime = File.GetLastWriteTime( e.FullPath ).ToString();

    // if there is no path info stored yet
    // or stored path has different time of write then the one now is inspected
    if ( !fileWriteTime.ContainsKey(path) ||
         fileWriteTime[path].ToString() != currentLastWriteTime
    )
    {
        //then we do the main thing
        log( "A CHANGE has occured with " + path );

        //lastly we update the last write time in the hashtable
        fileWriteTime[path] = currentLastWriteTime;
    }
}

Mainly I create a hashtable to store file write time information. Then if the hashtable has the filepath that is modified and it's time value is the same as the currently notified file's change then I know it is the duplicate of the event and ignore it.

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This worked for me thanks and is a nice and simple solution! –  superlogical Oct 15 '12 at 1:38
    
I assume you empty the hashtable periodically. –  ThunderGr Oct 11 '13 at 9:42
    
This would be accurate to the second but if the period between the two changes is long enough to pass a second it will fail. Moreover if you want more accuracy you could use ToString("o") but be prepared for more failures. –  Pragmateek Oct 22 '13 at 20:21

Here's my approach :

// Consider having a List<String> named _changedFiles

private void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    lock (_changedFiles)
    {
        if (_changedFiles.Contains(e.FullPath))
        {
            return;
        }
    }

    // do your stuff

    System.Timers.Timer timer = new Timer(1000) { AutoReset = false };
    timer.Elapsed += (timerElapsedSender, timerElapsedArgs) =>
    {
        lock (_changedFiles)
        {
            _changedFiles.Remove(e.FullPath);
        }
    };
   timer.Start();
}

This is the solution I used to solve this issue on a project where I was sending the file as attachment in a mail. It will easily avoid the twice fired event even with a smaller timer interval but in my case 1000 was alright since I was happier with missing few changes than with flooding the mailbox with > 1 message per second. At least it works just fine in case several files are changed at the exact same time.

Another solution I've thought of would be to replace the list with a dictionary mapping files to their respective MD5, so you wouldn't have to choose an arbitrary interval since you wouldn't have to delete the entry but update its value, and cancel your stuff if it hasn't changed. It has the downside of having a Dictionary growing in memory as files are monitored and eating more and more memory, but I've read somewhere that the amount of files monitored depends on the FSW's internal buffer, so maybe not that critical. Dunno how MD5 computing time would affect your code's performances either, careful =\

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I have changed the way I monitor files in directories. Instead of using the FileSystemWatcher I poll locations on another thread and then look at the LastWriteTime of the file.

DateTime lastWriteTime = File.GetLastWriteTime(someFilePath);

Using this information and keeping an index of a file path and it's latest write time I can determine files that have changed or that have been created in a particular location. This removes me from the oddities of the FileSystemWatcher. The main downside is that you need a data structure to store the LastWriteTime and the reference to the file, but it is reliable and easy to implement.

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6  
as well as you have to burn background cycles instead of being notified by a system event. –  Matthew Whited Dec 14 '09 at 20:40

You could try to open it for write, and if successful then you could assume the other application is done with the file.

private void OnChanged(object source, FileSystemEventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        using (var fs = File.OpenWrite(e.FullPath))
        {
        }
        //do your stuff
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        //no write access, other app not done
    }
}

Just opening it for write appears not to raise the changed event. So it should be safe.

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One possible 'hack' would be to throttle the events using Reactive Extensions for example:

var watcher = new FileSystemWatcher("./");

Observable.FromEventPattern<FileSystemEventArgs>(watcher, "Changed")
            .Throttle(new TimeSpan(500000))
            .Subscribe(HandleChangeEvent);

watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

In this case I'm throttling to 50ms, on my system that was enough, but higher values should be safer. (And like I said, it's still a 'hack').

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I have created a Git repo with a class that extends FileSystemWatcher to trigger the events only when copy is done. It discards all the changed events exept the last and it raise it only when the file become available for read.

Download FileSystemSafeWatcher and add it to your project.

Then use it as a normal FileSystemWatcher and monitor when the events are triggered.

var fsw = new FileExamSystemWatcher(file);
fsw.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
// Add event handlers here
fsw.Created += fsw_Created;
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if you register to the OnChanged event, then by deleting the monitored file before changing it might work, as long as you only need to monitor the OnChange event..

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2  
If I understand you correctly, you're suggesting to delete an existing file before changing it, and that should only raise 1 Changed event. Unfortunately that won't work. –  René Sep 5 '12 at 13:03

Well, here is my solution how to raise an event only once:

FileSystemWatcheк watcher = new FileSystemWatcher();

//'path' - path to the file that has been modified.
watcher.Changed += (s, e) => FileChanged(path);

here is implementation of FileChanged

//count is our counter to triger when we can raise and when not.
private int count = 0;
private void FileChanged(string path)
{
   if (count % 2 == 0)
     {
       //code here
     }

     count ++;
}
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This implementation assumes you'll always get exactly 2 notifications. That's not guaranteed any more than the original assumption of "one user action"=="one notification" –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 20 '11 at 13:34
    
it might be raised 3 times, in which case you'll handle it twice. If it was always raised exactly twice, they'd have fixed it so that it only raised the event once. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 21 '11 at 8:18
    
Exactly, it's because Changed event raised two times by the framework, and I don't need to handle it two times each time when it is raised. And with this approach it is actually guaranty that "one user action"=="one notification" . –  Julian Ustiyanovych Jul 21 '11 at 8:20
    
Hi Damien :) In my case it is raised two times. The case is, that user opens the file from our app in notepad++ and edit it. When user finished she/he save the file and than Changed event raise two times. I found in network that it is known issue, that's why I become with that solution, of course if they fix that issue I have to skip this code. But for now it is ok. What do u think ? –  Julian Ustiyanovych Jul 21 '11 at 8:32
7  
it's okay for the version of Notepad++ you've tested against, and the specific user scenario. The general issue is that the event will be generated an unknown number of times (variable based on the other applications involved, versions of said applications, the actions taken, etc) - you cannot, in general assume the event will be raised a fixed number of times. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 21 '11 at 17:00

Make it simple define one global variable var1 = true.

Private Sub FileWatchman_Changed(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.IO.FileSystemEventArgs) Handles FileWatchman.Changed
   If var1 = true 
       your logic goes here
       var1 = false
   Else
       var1 = true 
   End If
End Sub
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1  
Essentially what this does is that it ignores Changed events while processing a Changed event, and only then. So it doesn't really solve the problem if your processing is fast enough and completes before the second event is raised, both events will be processed. And besides, this implementation will cause problems if 2 files are changed at the same time. (Can happen on network shares or if multiple files are copied into a watched folder) –  René Sep 5 '12 at 13:02
1  
How does this solve the problem? –  Johnny Graber Oct 28 '12 at 10:09

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