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Hi I am relatively new to spring. Am using Annotations. My doubt begin I have a class as

public class MyClassA{

@Autowired
private MyClassB variableClassB;

// more code here
.
.
.

in my applicationContext.xml

<context:component-scan base-package="package containing MyClassB" />

My question being do I need to add bean declaration in applicationContext.xml as follows

<bean id="classB" class="com.MyClassB"

or is it sufficient to have @Autowired annotation

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No it is not.

If your MyClassB is annotated with annotations like @Component, @Service, @Repository or @Controller the component scan will create a bean for the class in the bean factory.

If you are not using any of these annotations then, you need to create a bean manually as you have given

Ex:

@Component
public class MyClassB{
}
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NO I don't have any of these annotations. Its just a POJO class. So I guess I need to define a bean in applicationContext.xml. Right? –  Adi Jul 15 '13 at 7:04
    
@Aditya yes you need to –  Arun P Johny Jul 15 '13 at 7:09
    
Thanks Arun... :) –  Adi Jul 15 '13 at 7:11

If you have Annotation @Component on MyClassB, it's no need to add <bean id="classB" class="com.MyClassB" in applicationContext.xml. Otherwise, needed.

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The whole purpose of the @Autowired annotation is just to avoid explicitly mentioning the bean in the xml file. Doing

<context:component-scan base-package="package containing MyClassB" />

checks the package and searches for the annotations @Controller, @Service, @Repository etc and makes the bean itself.

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NO I don't have any of these annotations. Its just a POJO class. So I guess I need to define a bean in applicationContext.xml? –  Adi Jul 15 '13 at 7:01

The @Autowired annotation lets you avoid having to explicitly state the need for MyClassB in the XML declaration of MyClassA, but it does not mean that the MyClassB bean is created automatically. If you don't want to have MyClassB appearing in the XML at all, you need to do a context:component-scan to find the @Bean (and derived) annotations. (The scan is fairly expensive, so you need to ask for it explicitly.)

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