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I have a text file with a lot of such lines.

Jul 15 12:12:51 whitelist logger: 1|999999999999|id:d9faff7c-4016-4343-b494-37028763bb66 submit date:1307130919 done date:1307130919 stat:DELIVRD err:0|L_VB3_NM_K_P|1373687445|vivnel2|L_VB3_GH_K_P|promo_camp1-bd153424349bc647|1

I need to insert the values in the database and hence I need to separate the values.

1) logger
2) submit date
3) done date
4) stat
5) err

The following is working to isolate the logger string.

tail  messages | grep logger: | awk -F'logger: ' '{print $2}' | awk '{print $1}'

Is it the right way to divide a string? Any better option available?

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python? use a regex –  Karoly Horvath Jul 15 '13 at 7:30
1  
Your script would print 1|999999999999|id:d9faff7c-4016-4343-b494-37028763bb66 for the "logger". Is that what you want? Show the expected output from your sample input, and add another couple of lines of sample input to help clarify your requirements. –  Ed Morton Jul 15 '13 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are many ways to accomplish this in Python. One simple approach is to use Python's built in regular expressions. Assuming the log output always follows the rules mentioned, you could extract the parts of interest like this:

import re

s = "Jul 15 12:12:51 whitelist logger: 1|999999999999|id:d9faff7c-4016-4343-b494-37028763bb66 submit date:1307130919 done date:1307130919 stat:DELIVRD err:0|L_VB3_NM_K_P|1373687445|vivnel2|L_VB3_GH_K_P|promo_camp1-bd153424349bc647|1"

logger_re = re.compile(
"logger: ([^ ]+)\
 submit date:(\d+)\
 done date:(\d+)\
 stat:(.+)\
 err:(.+)$")

print logger_re.search(s).groups()

The .groups() method returns back a tuple of the strings found within the () parenthesis.

See http://docs.python.org/2/library/re.html

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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. I will accept the answer after I compare other answers. –  shantanuo Jul 15 '13 at 8:02
    
How do I select the date at the beginning? The text before the word "whitelist" –  shantanuo Jul 15 '13 at 8:04

If you put the key words in a file, this will work: code for GNU :

 sed -nr 's#.*#h;s/.*(&):\\s*(\\w+).*/\\1:\\2/p;g#p' file2|sed -nrf - file1

Example:

$ cat file1
Jul 15 12:12:51 whitelist logger: 1|999999999999|id:d9faff7c-4016-4343-b494-37028763bb66 submit date:1307130919 done date:1307130919 stat:DELIVRD err:0|L_VB3_NM_K_P|1373687445|vivnel2|L_VB3_GH_K_P|promo_camp1-bd153424349bc647|1

$ cat file2
logger
submit date
done date
stat
err

$ sed -nr 's#.*#h;s/.*(&):\\s*(\\w+).*/\\1:\\2/p;g#p' file2|sed -nrf - file1
logger:1
submit date:1307130919
done date:1307130919
stat:DELIVRD
err:0

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