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How to get the index of all unmasked elements? The following is an example where I'm struggling with. I've got two equal sized numpy arrays, x and m. Now I want to use array m as a mask on x to extract both values and index of the unmasked values. I think that some code will explain better

numpy array x & m

>>> x = np.array([[3,5,9],[6,0,7],[2,3,4]])
>>> x
array([[3, 5, 9],
       [6, 0, 7],
       [2, 3, 4]])
>>> m = np.array([[1,1,2],[2,1,1],[2,1,2]])
>>> m
array([[1, 1, 2],
       [2, 1, 1],
       [2, 1, 2]])

Now I want to extract the values of x where m is equal to 1

>>> mo = ma.array(m,mask=(m<>1))
>>> mo
masked_array(data =
 [[1 1 --]
 [-- 1 1]
 [-- 1 --]],
             mask =
 [[False False  True]
 [ True False False]
 [ True False  True]],
       fill_value = 999999)

>>> xm = ma.masked_array(x,mask=mo.mask, dtype=int)
>>> xm
masked_array(data =
 [[3 5 --]
 [-- 0 7]
 [-- 3 --]],
             mask =
 [[False False  True]
 [ True False False]
 [ True False  True]],
       fill_value = 999999)

I want to have the index of the values where mask is False. Now I can use the nonzero function from ma library, but my arrays also contains zero values. As can be seen, value [1,1] is missing:

>>> xmindex = np.transpose(ma.MaskedArray.nonzero(xm))
>>> xmindex
array([[0, 0],
       [0, 1],
       [1, 2],
       [2, 1]])

In short, how to get the index of all unmasked elements and not only the nonzero values?

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did you consider numpy.where() ? –  usethedeathstar Jul 15 '13 at 7:28
    
No, not yet. But how would you use it in this case? –  Mattijn Jul 15 '13 at 7:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would try, as suggested above, with numpy.where():

x = np.array([[3,5,9],[6,0,7],[2,3,4]])
m = np.array([[1,1,2],[2,1,1],[2,1,2]])
indices = np.where(m == 1)  # indices contains two arrays, the column and row indices
values = x[indices]

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
Unless you need the actual indices for something else, this is serious overkill: all you need is the boolean array,i.e. values = x[m == 1] will return the exact same data and runs much faster. –  Jaime Jul 15 '13 at 15:15
    
You are right, of course. –  Jblasco Jul 15 '13 at 21:34

This is one possibility. But I'm almost sure it's too circuitous.

>>> xmindex = np.transpose(np.concatenate(((ma.MaskedArray.nonzero(xm==0), 
              ma.MaskedArray.nonzero(xm!=0))),axis=1))
>>> xmindex
array([[1, 1],
       [0, 0],
       [0, 1],
       [1, 2],
       [2, 1]])

And then sorting

>>> xmindex = xmindex[np.lexsort((xmindex[:,1],xmindex[:,0]))]
>>> xmindex
array([[0, 0],
       [0, 1],
       [1, 1],
       [1, 2],
       [2, 1]])
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