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Why would you declare an IEnumerable<T> readonly?

From the this article on async & await we have the following code.

class OrderHandler
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<Order> _orders;

    public OrderHandler()
    {
        // Set orders.
    }
    public IEnumerable<Order> GetAllOrders()
    {
        return _orders;
    }
}

IEnumerable<T> is immutable. How is this different from the readonly keyword?

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1  
IEnumerable<T> isn't itself immutable, the list it iterates can change between iterations. Unless it's running over an IImmutableList<T>, basically it depends on the underlying list. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 15 '13 at 8:27
1  
IEnumerable<T> is what C++ would call const - it doesn't give you any operations to modify the object, but it cannot stop the object from being modified via other interfaces. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 15 '13 at 8:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The readonly keyword here applies to the field _orders. It simply means that that the field can not be assigned a different value during the lifetime of the object. For example, this is not possible:

class OrderHandler
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<Order> _orders;

    public OrderHandler()
    {
        // Set orders.
    }

    void SomeMethod()
    {
        _orders = new Order[0];
    }
}

You will receive this compiler error:

A readonly field cannot be assigned to (except in a constructor or a variable initializer)

This does not make the collection read-only. For example, you could still do this:

class OrderHandler
{
    public readonly IEnumerable<Order> Orders;

    public OrderHandler()
    {
        Orders = new List<Order>();
    }
}

((List<Order>)OrderHandler.Orders).Add(new Order());

Which would probably violate the thread-safety of the class. See Tigran's answer for information on immutable collections.

Further Reading

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Would ReadOnlyCollection<T> achieve the same? the readonly in this case would be redundant? –  Sam Leach Jul 15 '13 at 8:26
    
@SamLeach No. The two are very different. The readonly applies to the field, not to the semantics of the type. –  p.s.w.g Jul 15 '13 at 8:27
1  
@SamLeach for example, if you initialise a readonly property in the constructor, it can never be null and no consumers of the class can ever assign null to the list. As far as expected behaviours of lists go, this is very healthy, as a list should be empty or have items, but never null. –  Adrian Thompson Phillips Jul 15 '13 at 8:30
    
As an after thought, if the type is a mutable reference type, it can still be modified? –  Sam Leach Jul 15 '13 at 8:44
    
@SamLeach Yes, see my updated answer. I've provided an example of how it can be modified even if you only expose an immutable interface and mark the field as readonly. The only thing that readonly actually makes read only, is the field. –  p.s.w.g Jul 15 '13 at 8:46

In addition would add that event if it defines _orders as immutable, this makes immutable only reference itself, but not the content of that collection. I still can change object inside that enumeration.

For this reason beginning from the C# 5.0, we will get :

Immutable Collections in .NET Framework

Quoting article:

Immutable Collections are collections which guarantees that they never change their content and completely thread safe

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As others have noted, the readonly qualifier makes the reference stored in a class-object's class-type field immutable once the constructor of that object has finished, but has no such effect on any object to which the reference may refer. There is no plausible means by which the qualifier could affect in that way the object to which the reference refers, since other copies of the reference could exist stored in fields without such a qualifier.

That does not, however, imply that the readonly keyword cannot usefully be applied to mutable objects. Suppose one had a class Foo with a field stuff that held an IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<int,string>>, and one wanted it to expose a property Keys of a type which implements IEnumerable<int> containing the key-part of each item in stuff. If stuff is held a read-only field, then a wrapper object returned by Keys could hold a reference to stuff and have a "live view" of any changes to the collection. If, however, stuff were not a read-only field, then the wrapper object would have to have a reference to the Foo upon which the Keys property was called if it wanted to ensure that it would always behave as a live view.

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