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In an application, there are at least two ways for dealing with domain object persistence and an ORM.

  • Mapping directly the domain object to persistence using some kind of ORM (xml or annotations)
  • Making separation of concerns in case of a lot of impedance mismatch between your domain and your persistent model (table columns). That means, domain object is persistence agnostic and there are some conversions to some corresponding persistent object, this latter maps to an ORM.

As pure DDD developers know, domain should not be driven by your database needs, thus in my project, I use this separation of concerns. Someone would think of YAGNI, someone would say "great" (like here). My project will need some different databases according to my need of reusability, so I chose the separation of concerns between my domain model and my persistent model. But I came across an issue (some kind of performance loss), with Spring-Data. A detail maybe, but just assume an ORM that doesn't have the functionnality of merge, or anything related, to reattach detached entities to the current transaction.

To understand, let's suppose this conceptual code (in Java):

@Transaction
public void participateToMeeting(String userId, String meetingId){
  User user = userRepository.ofId(userId);  //returns a User domain type
  Meeting meeting = meetingRepository.ofId(meetingId); //returns a Meeting domain type
  if(user != null && meeting != null) {
    user.participate(meeting);    // as attached entity, this would automatically persist the relationship
  }
}

But if henceforth, persistence occurs on the persistent model, not the domain model directly, we'd lose the attachement, since during conversion from domain to persistent object (indeed, repositories would now deal with persistent objects (instead of domain model directly) and merely convert the result as domain object as return type), the managedEntity state is lost.

    @Transaction
        public void participateToMeeting(String userId, String meetingId){
          User user = userRepository.ofId(userId);  //returns a User domain type (converted from UserPO to User)
          Meeting meeting = meetingRepository.ofId(meetingId); //returns a Meeting domain type (converted from MeetingPO to UserPO)
          if(user != null && meeting != null) {
            userRepository.participateToMeeting(user, meeting); 
//although not conventional, adding this kind of method allows to convert User and Meeting to some persistent object: UserPO and MeetingPO, before proceeding to persistence
          }
        }

Here's the issue: While converting from User to UserPO (in my infrastructure layer), I lose the entity "attachment". Thus, in the userRepository.participateToMeeting method, I have to retrieve UserPO and MeetingPO again from database (to make them attached)...therefore involving, two additional requests.

Is there a better practice to deal with conversions domain object/persistent object without this performance loss?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I disagree with the linked article. While I agree that the concerns between the domain model and the persistence model are different, the entire purpose of an ORM is to map between a domain model and a persistence model. Since the ORM is supposed to provide that mapping, creating an additional class hierarchy to facilitate mapping is overkill and can lead to problems like the one you're describing. The fact that the domain model resembles the data model is indeed far more than a mere coincidence. Instead, they are both representing aspects of the same domain and should therefore have a high degree of correspondence. The ORM is designed to address the mismatch between an object model and a corresponding relational model. There are cases where mapping gets tough, but in NHibernate for example, these can be addressed by implementing custom user types for component mappings.

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I agree with you. However, as this post evokes, Spring-Data (for Neo4j in this case but I suppose even Spring-Data in general), does not support (easily) nested types: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/neo4j/Uc15iftJd_E Thus, I would be stuck if I want to store for instance, a Meetingaggregate root, containing itself a Schedule value object containing two fields: startDate and endDate, into two distinct elements ("nodes" in my case). That's why I prefer keeping this separation of concerns, even if it leads to some additional effort. –  Mik378 Jul 15 '13 at 18:02
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