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So I am trying to modify the code provided by Microsoft(here) to use WriteConsoleInput, instead of WriteFile, but it says the handle is invalid (I'm betting it is something really silly), like how the handle is initially created or something.

So my question, what's the difference between the handles needed for WriteConsoleInput, and the handle for WriteFile?

WriteConsoleInput

WriteFile

I'm guessing it has to do with the permissions flag of the HANDLE created by CreateFile compared to the inherited handles created by the CreateProcess/CreatePipe/DuplicateHandle process.

I decided it would be easier if you can see the problem, so here is my full solution (Using Visual Studio 2012) Both the child and parent app are included.

ConsoleRedir on GitHub

As a note, I need the child app to use the ReadConsoleInput, and that's been the source of my frustration.

Original Method:

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
// GetAndSendInputThreadOrig
// Thread procedure that monitors the console for input and sends input
// to the child process through the input pipe.
// This thread ends when the child application exits.
// Original from http://support.microsoft.com/kb/190351
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
DWORD WINAPI GetAndSendInputThreadOrig(LPVOID lpvThreadParam)
{
    CHAR read_buff[256];
    DWORD nBytesRead,nBytesWrote;
    HANDLE hPipeWrite = (HANDLE)lpvThreadParam;

    // Get input from our console and send it to child through the pipe.
    while (bRunThread)
    {
        if(!ReadConsole(hStdIn,read_buff,1,&nBytesRead,NULL))
            DisplayError("ReadConsole");

        read_buff[nBytesRead] = '\0'; // Follow input with a NULL.

        if (!WriteFile(hPipeWrite,read_buff,nBytesRead,&nBytesWrote,NULL))
        {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_NO_DATA)
                break; // Pipe was closed (normal exit path).
            else
                DisplayError("WriteFile");
        }
    }

    return 1;
}

My modified version (have to build keystroke):

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
// GetAndSendInputThread
// Thread procedure that monitors the console for input and sends input
// to the child process through the input pipe.
// This thread ends when the child application exits.
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 
DWORD WINAPI GetAndSendInputThread(LPVOID lpvThreadParam)
{
    CHAR read_buff[256];
    DWORD nBytesWrote;
    HANDLE hPipeWrite = (HANDLE)lpvThreadParam;

    // Get input from our console and send it to child through the pipe.
    while (bRunThread)
    {
        INPUT_RECORD inputRecords[4];
        // Build a keyboard event, press '?' and then press RETURN
        inputRecords[0].EventType = KEY_EVENT;
        inputRecords[0].Event.KeyEvent.bKeyDown = TRUE;
        inputRecords[0].Event.KeyEvent.uChar.UnicodeChar = '?';
        inputRecords[1].EventType = KEY_EVENT;
        inputRecords[1].Event.KeyEvent.bKeyDown = FALSE;
        inputRecords[1].Event.KeyEvent.uChar.UnicodeChar = '?';
        inputRecords[2].EventType = KEY_EVENT;
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.bKeyDown = TRUE;
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.dwControlKeyState = 0;
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.uChar.UnicodeChar = '\r';
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.wRepeatCount = 1;
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.wVirtualKeyCode = VK_RETURN;
        inputRecords[2].Event.KeyEvent.wVirtualScanCode = MapVirtualKey(VK_RETURN, MAPVK_VK_TO_VSC);
        inputRecords[3].EventType = KEY_EVENT;
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.bKeyDown = FALSE;
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.dwControlKeyState = 0;
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.uChar.UnicodeChar = '\r';
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.wRepeatCount = 1;
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.wVirtualKeyCode = VK_RETURN;
        inputRecords[3].Event.KeyEvent.wVirtualScanCode = MapVirtualKey(VK_RETURN, MAPVK_VK_TO_VSC);


        if (!WriteConsoleInput(hPipeWrite,inputRecords,sizeof(inputRecords) / sizeof(*inputRecords),&nBytesWrote))
        {
            if (GetLastError() == ERROR_NO_DATA)
                break; // Pipe was closed (normal exit path).
            else
                DisplayError("WriteConsoleInput");
        }
    }

    return 1;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Think of a HANDLE as a pointer to a struct. A pointer is just a pointer, but a struct isn't comparable to another struct. –  Waldermort Jul 15 '13 at 9:03
    
This is my first project dealing with a handle that isn't just saving a file to disk, so what you said tells me that I get an "invalid handle" because well, it's not a CONSOLE input handle, it's just a handle to STDIN. Not the same thing. Is that right? –  Kyle Johnson Jul 15 '13 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

WriteConsoleInput requires that the handle is a "A handle to the console input buffer." (First sentence in the description of the handle input parameter in the linked page in your question).

You need to use the handle from GetStdHandle to get a suitable handle.

WriteConsoleInput ONLY works on a direct handle to the console, not a redirected pipe or similar.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I need to find another way to send commands to the child's input buffer then, eh? –  Kyle Johnson Jul 15 '13 at 15:57
1  
Then out of curiosity, because the child app is using ReadConsoleInput, is there any way to send data between the apps if I cannot get the CONIN$ handle of the child? It sounded like that was the only way to send an INPUT_RECORD was with WriteConsoleInput. –  Kyle Johnson Jul 15 '13 at 16:04

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