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I have the following basic C++ code for transferring a file via UDP using sockets on linux. The problem is, not all the packets gets delivered (like only 8 bytes out of 345kb is received), I know UDP is unreliable but does this have something to do with my code or its just because of UDP's unreliability?

Client side

sockfd=socket(AF_INET,SOCK_DGRAM,0);

bzero(&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));
servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr=inet_addr("192.168.0.152");
servaddr.sin_port=htons(32000);
ifstream myfile("345kb.doc", ios::in);
int i=0;
char* memblock;
double size;
if(myfile.is_open()) {
    myfile.seekg(0,ios::end);
    size=(double)myfile.tellg();
    memblock=new char[1024];
    myfile.seekg(0,ios::beg);
    double filesize=size;
    cout<<filesize;
    int n;
    int ab=(int)filesize%1024;
    while(filesize>1024){
        myfile.read(memblock,1024);
        cout<<"\nREAD:"<<strlen(memblock)<<"\n"<<"SENT:";
        n=sendto(sockfd,memblock,strlen(memblock),0,(struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));
        filesize=filesize-1024;
        cout<<n<<"\n";
    }
    myfile.read(memblock,1024);
    n=sendto(sockfd,memblock,strlen(memblock),0,(struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));
    std::cout<<"HI"<<endl;
} else {
    printf("\nFILE NOT OPENED \n");
}

SERVER side

int sockfd,n;
struct sockaddr_in servaddr,cliaddr;
socklen_t len;
char mesg[1024];

sockfd=socket(AF_INET,SOCK_DGRAM,0);

bzero(&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));
servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr=htonl(INADDR_ANY);
servaddr.sin_port=htons(32000);
bind(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));

//for (;;)
//{
    ofstream myfile;
    myfile.open("345kbsssss.doc",ios::out|ios::app);
    if(myfile.is_open()) {
        long i=0;
        len = sizeof(cliaddr);
        while((n = recvfrom(sockfd,mesg,1024,0,(struct sockaddr *)&cliaddr,&len))>0){
            std::cout<<"HI\n";
            //n=recvfrom(sockfd,mesg,256,0,(struct sockaddr *)&cliaddr,&len);
            myfile.write(mesg,n);
        }
    }
    else printf("\nFILE NOT CREATED\n");
//}
share|improve this question
    
You could try changing the transfer type to TCP (if that's possible server side, otherwise just use netcat for example) and see if your file is properly delivered. If not, that's a problem with your code. –  Nbr44 Jul 15 '13 at 10:17
    
i got it with TCP but i just want to try with UDP just to make it work... –  stranger Jul 15 '13 at 10:19
    
Also the server is recvfrom()ing only once –  stranger Jul 15 '13 at 10:22
    
We have 2013. After having solved this issue, you should quite urgently familiarize yourself with IPv6. –  glglgl Jul 15 '13 at 10:51
    
I will @glglgl ;) –  stranger Jul 15 '13 at 11:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both are true:

  • UDP is not meant to be used for file transfer without implementing checking, reordering and retransmission. Instead of implementing all these over UDP, it is much better just to switch to TCP. With the rare exception of resource limited embedded systems.

  • In your code you use strlen to get block length, since the file (most probably) is binary this is producing incorrect length values and you do not transmit the whole file data. strlen operates on zero terminated strings and counts only up to the first 0 byte in the data.

To get more correct results, the easiest way is to replace strlen(memblock) with min(1024,filesize). This is not a perfect solution because it does not check exactly how many bytes were read by myfile.read.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, I'm trying that now –  stranger Jul 15 '13 at 10:35
    
Yea you were right strlen was a mistakeand i changed it but now im receiving partial file (like 100kb out of 345kb), but again the server(receiver) gets stuck at that point and doesnt exit... –  stranger Jul 15 '13 at 10:39

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