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In order to cause the javascript file to expire on a web page perhaps someone could answer any of the following specific questions:

  1. Does the script file expire when the page expires?
  2. Should I add a version number to the name of my various script files (and html pages?)
  3. If there is no attribute for expiry, is there server side header info that can be added to the script?
  4. Is there a recommended best practice(s) where this is concerned?
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1) Does the script file expire when the page expires?

No, it expires according to the caching information provided when the js file was served up, unless it is an html application in which case it can be expired earlier by changing the timestamp on the manifest file.

2) Should I add a version number to the name of my various script files (and html pages?)

This is a common practice for static content in combination with a very long expiry time

3) If there is no attribute for expiry, is there server side header info that can be added to the script?

No (you can embed meta header data in HTML but not in other content types).

4) Is there a recommended best practice(s) where this is concerned?

Yes, there's lots of "best practices". Usually option 2 with the added caveat that the version information should be in the path rather than the query. Doing this by hand can be a PITA: mod_pagespeed (and some other tools) do it automagically.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, my paths are limited to "current" and "next" but that could be a better approach. I assume I would use redirects in the prior version? – DHorse Jul 15 '13 at 11:33
1  
Presumably the stuff in 'next' will eventually move to 'current' - hence the same path being used for different content. Not a good idea. Not user what you mean by redirects. Since a 30X response back to the browser is a very bad idea for performance (and a lot of browsers won't cache a response from a redirection). – symcbean Jul 15 '13 at 13:29
    
I understand your point. I am wondering how I would handle users that have links to a previous version (and path.) I assume that you mean all the users merely use a www.mysite.ca and that is where I update for the new path. Therefore redirects should not be required. – DHorse Jul 19 '13 at 18:39
    
"user that have links to a previous version" - you think you your users bookmark javascript files? – symcbean Jul 21 '13 at 23:29

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