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I would like to declare / define my delegate and callback function inside of the calling method. Is that possible ? If yes how ? This is my code that I want to execute my first implant operation on:

delegate bool myDelegate(IntPtr module, string type, IntPtr lParam);

public static bool EnumResTypeProc(IntPtr module, string typename, IntPtr lParam)
{
    (((GCHandle) lParam).Target as List<string>).Add(typename);
    return true;
}

public static string[] getResourceTypes(IntPtr module)
{
    List<string> result = new List<string>();
    GCHandle pin = GCHandle.Alloc(result);
    WinApi.EnumResourceTypes(module, Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(new myDelegate(EnumResTypeProc)), (IntPtr)pin);
    pin.Free();
    return result.ToArray();
}


The closest I get:

delegate bool myDelegate(IntPtr module, string type, IntPtr lParam);

public static string[] getResourceTypes(IntPtr module)
{
    List<string> result = new List<string>();
    GCHandle pin = GCHandle.Alloc(result);
    myDelegate d = delegate(IntPtr handle, string typename, IntPtr lParam)
        { (((GCHandle) lParam).Target as List<string>).Add(typename); return true; };
    WinApi.EnumResourceTypes(module, Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(d), (IntPtr) pin);
    pin.Free();
    return result.ToArray();
}


Declaring the delegate inside a method is not possible at this point. Even if compiled it causes unmanaged code to crash my application.

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3 Answers 3

Yes, you can use an anonymous method or a lambda expression.

// untested
Func<IntPtr, string, IntPtr, bool> inline = (module, typename, lParam) =>
{
    (((GCHandle)lParam).Target as List<string>).Add(typename);
    return true;
};

WinApi.EnumResourceTypes(module, Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(inline), (IntPtr)pin);
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I would avoid the type specification along with parameters. LHS would do it, isnt it? –  nawfal Jul 15 '13 at 12:04
    
@nawfal - Yes, copy/paste error. Editing. –  Henk Holterman Jul 15 '13 at 12:05
1  
Well, like I said: untested. You voided the warranty by running it. –  Henk Holterman Jul 15 '13 at 12:11
1  
@nawfal see original post + edit. Both versions work fine. Trying to declare the delegate inside of my method seems to cause crashes. –  Bitterblue Jul 15 '13 at 12:20
1  
@nawfal I'll try it. Maybe important: App crashes in unmanaged code. So I don't get an exception. –  Bitterblue Jul 15 '13 at 12:29

Or my example:

public delegate void AsyncMethodCaller(strind inputdata);


 void someMethod()
{
//
// ... some actions 
//
AsyncMethodCaller caller = new AsyncMethodCaller(this.ProcessInputData);

   // Initiate the asychronous call.
   IAsyncResult result = caller.BeginInvoke("my data");
}

void ProcessInputData(string inputData)
{
    // some actions
}
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