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I am going to be starting a javascript reporting engine for my website, and have started some prototyping using MooTools. I really like being able to do things like this:

function showLeagues(leagues) {
    var leagueList = $("leagues");
    leagueList.empty();
    for(var i = 0; i<leagues.length; ++i) {
    	var listItem = getLeagueListElement(leagues[i]);
    	leagueList.adopt(listItem);
    }
}

function getLeagueListElement(league) {
    var listItem = new Element('li');
    var newElement = new Element('a', {
        'html': league.name,
        'href': '?league='+league.key,
        'events': {
            	'click': function() { showLeague(league); return false; }
        }
    });
    listItem.adopt(newElement);
    return listItem;
}

From what I've seen, jQuery's "adopt" type methods only take html strings or DOM Elements. Is there any jQuery equivalent to MooTools' Element?


EDIT: The big thing I'm looking for here is the programmatic attachment of my click event to the link.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

syntactically, it may be nicer to use jQuery to do it, but its probably more efficient to use

  document.createElement('li')

And eliminate the need for at the bare minimum a string comparison test and a minor token parse.

flydom may also tickle your interest if you insist on generating a lot of dom nodes. ( It should be faster in theory, but have not tested it )


Note: Internally, jQuery("<html></html>") looks like it effectively does this(oversimplified):

jQuery(matcher) --> function(matcher)
{
   return jQuery.fn.init(matcher) --> function(matcher)
   {
      return  this.setArray(
        jQuery.makeArray(
           jQuery.clean(matcher) --> function(matcher)
           { 
               div = document.createElement('div');
               div.innerHTML = matcher;
               return div.childNodes;
           }
        )
      );
   }
}

So one would presume "document.createElement" is thus a "requirement", and if you know what you want out ( ie: not parising some 3rd party data with $( datahere ) ) then document.createElement would imho be just as logical and with a speed boost to avoid the numerous regexps and slow string manipulations.

By comparison: jQuery(document.createElement('div')) looks like it effectively does this(oversimplified):

jQuery(matcher) --> function(matcher)
{
   return jQuery.fn.init(matcher) --> function(matcher)
   {
       this[0] = matcher; 
       this.length = 1; 
       return this; 
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any browser that is modern enough to be supported by the main js libraries that doesn't include those DOM methods? My desire to use framework-specific code was twofold - one, to keep syntax consistent in my code, and two, to make sure I didn't have to care about browser differences. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 7 '08 at 11:28
    
Answer extended. From what i can tell, if the browser doesn't support document.createElement, then not even jQuery will work on it. –  Kent Fredric Oct 8 '08 at 9:00
    
To be sure of your intent, you are saying that instead of: $('<a></a>').attr('href', '?league=' + league.key)..., you would recommend: $(document.createElement("a")).attr('href', '?league=' + league.key)... ? –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 9 '08 at 15:35
    
yes. that is what I would do :) –  Kent Fredric Oct 9 '08 at 17:20
1  
I'd like to add - I've seen several articles (and done a few tests of my own) and doing $(document.createElement('a')) is consistently faster in creating new elements for jQuery then relying on jQuery to do this for you. Plain JS will probably always be faster then relying on the library to do it for you (including setting element attributes, but sometimes we're talking millisecond differences, so it's almost moot, unless you're all about squeezing as much as possible). –  keif Mar 16 '11 at 19:01

Here's that same thing in jQuery. Basically to create a new element, you just put in the HTML you want.

function showLeagues(leagues) {
    var $leagueList = $("#leagues");
    $leagueList.empty();
    $.each(leagues, function (index, league) {
        $leagueList.append(getLeagueListElement(league));
    });
}

function getLeagueListElement(league) {
    return $('<li></li>')
        .append($('<a></a>')
            .html(league.name)
            .attr('href', '?league=' + league.key)
            .click(function() {
                showLeague(league);
                return false;
            })
        )
    ;
}
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1  
Instead of $('<li></li>') you can just use $('<li/>') btw –  James Oct 7 '08 at 10:46
    
good catch Jimmy. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 7 '08 at 12:26
2  
do note, the "<li/>" code is sub-optimal, and looking at the code shows that jquery does regexp to expand it back to "<li></li>" ;) –  Kent Fredric Oct 8 '08 at 8:59

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