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I have an application which places some data into a long linked list occupying almost all JVM memory in JVM. When a new element is inserted, the last one element is removed so that size of the list is always a constant. When I set JVM memory size to 6GB I am starting to get regular GC pauses for: 3.4 seconds which occur approximately every 10 seconds.

I'm using Hotspot Java 1.7.0, 64bit on Linux with 4 cores and 16GB RAM. The following JVM parameters are passed: -Xmx6g -XX:+PrintGC -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC -XX:+UseParNewGC

Could you please advice some better options to minimize GC pause time to some 100 milliseconds or so? I've tried to find such options muself, but haven't suceeded.

The sources are shown below:

    LinkedList<long[]> list = new LinkedList<long[]>();

    // initial fill in
    for(int i = 0; i < 16L*1024*1024; i ++) {
        list.add(new long[16]);
    }

    System.out.printf("total: %5.1f free: %5.1f\n",((float)Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory())/(1024*1024*1024), ((float)Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory())/(1024*1024*1024));

    // the main stuff
    for(;;) {
        list.removeFirst();
        list.add(new long[16]);
    }

Update: During the discussion below I realized that people are trying to suggest some changes in the code. So I need to explain a bit more on the background of the problem. The source example is a synthetic unreal code. Just it well illustrates the problem of a lot of old gen objects. I encounter this problem when trying to implement a highly loaded caching solution which has some insertion and eviction strategy. This often leads to the problem of the old gen garbage. My goal here is to find the best possible solution using JVM options. Here I do not want to consider code improvements. I suppose that if there is a kind of magic GC parameter combination which makes my example to work with pauses below 100ms it might solve also the more generic problem or at least provide some hints for similar cases.

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Could you post your GC logs with -XX:+PrintGCDetails? –  Alexey Ragozin Jul 15 '13 at 19:12
    
What is frequency of your inserts and length of queue for 6GiB case? –  Alexey Ragozin Jul 15 '13 at 19:13
1  
You're rapidly generating garbage, not just the list elements, but the long[16] blocks, which are probably bigger than the list elements. They need to be collected. Are you just trying to do GC more often, in smaller amounts? –  Mike Dunlavey Jul 18 '13 at 14:20
    
yes, the goal is to force GC to execute more often to avoid "stop world" pauses longer than 100ms. The goal is latency not the throughput. –  Maxim Zakharenkov Jul 18 '13 at 14:31

7 Answers 7

I'd try replacing the monstrous linked list with an ArrayDequeue, especially since the queue size is constant.

An extremely long linked list is liable to lead to performance issues for a garbage collector that implements marking recursively. The collector is likely to be happier with a large array that can be marked iteratively.

UPDATE

There is one obscure GC tuning parameter that might help:

If you made this parameter much bigger, it might be sufficient to stop the CMS collector from flipping into non-incremental mode if marking is deeply recursive (as it is likely to be for a monstrous linked-list.)

However, doing that is going to increase your JVM's overall memory usage. My "back of the envelope" thinking is that you'd need a marking stack of in the region of at least 192 Mbytes to mark a linked list with 16M elements. And that needs to be multiplied by the number of GC threads that do marking.


The goal of my question is not to change Java code. Just imagine you have a correct java program which does not cause OutOfMemoryError. You have to find the right JVM parameters without changing the code. Actually I have understanding about the causes of such pauses, just I have no idea how to tune JVM to make the pauses less than 100ms.

I'm afraid that in that case your goal is likely to be unachievable (not withstanding the above). If an application is sufficiently GC-unfriendly, you will get poor GC performance.

Anyway, your larger goal is (should be) to fix the performance problems by whatever means are necessary. Fix the program. In this case, the fix is likely to have other benefits as well; e.g. reduced memory usage.

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The goal of my question is not to change Java code. Just imagine you have a correct java program which does not cause OutOfMemoryError. You have to find the right JVM parameters without changing the code. Actually I have understanding about the causes of such pauses, just I have no idea how to tune JVM to make the pauses less than 100ms. –  Maxim Zakharenkov Jul 15 '13 at 14:49
1  
+1 for ArrayDequeue, it is a good idea even if would not solve pauses by itself –  Alexey Ragozin Jul 15 '13 at 19:11
1  
@Maxim: Sorry, that's not how optimization works, especially for something as sensitive to memory layout as GC behavior. Tuning GC will not make up for deficiencies in choice of algorithm. You are crippling your optimization effort by not changing the code. –  Steven Schlansker Jul 15 '13 at 22:56
    
I probably need to explain more about the problem. The example I given is a synthetic unreal code. Just it well illustrates the problem of a huge amount of data in tenured space. The real life case is a cache implementation which has some addition and eviction strategy which might not be exactly FIFO. Different attempts of implementing such data structure lead to similar problem where you have a lot of old gen objects. I am trying to find more less generic solution for pause-less GC for similar cases. At least want to understand the best I can achieve with GC option tuning. –  Maxim Zakharenkov Jul 16 '13 at 9:28
    
@MaximZakharenkov - Not withstanding that, you will get better results by modifying the code than by GC tuning. Especially, since the only applicable tuning knob has a clear downside. It sounds like the real problem is that the data structure is long-lived ... and there's not much you can do about that. A custom queue data structure implemented as a list of arrays of long[] or and array of arrays of long[] might have better GC characteristics. –  Stephen C Jul 16 '13 at 10:29

I am working on a primitive collections library called Banana which supports primitive linked lists. your use case it pretty much an ideal use case where Banana shines, but it can do much more (including variable length blocks, which you are not using but may be using in your real world case).

this is the result of this benchmark on my computer:

Banana : 1269 ms elapsed
Banana : total:   2.5 GB,  free:   0.5 GB, used =   2.1 GB, Banana reports that it's actually using   2.1 GB
Java : 13543 ms elapsed
Java : total:   6.2 GB,  free:   2.0 GB, used =   4.2 GB

You can see that Banana is much faster, and uses less memory. (Java memory will be better if you run it by itself without running the banana function first

Java : 14426 ms elapsed
Java : total:   5.8 GB,  free:   1.9 GB, used =   3.9 GB

But still not anywhere near Banana.

package net.yadan.banana.list;

public class LinkedListBenchmark {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    banana();
    java();
  }

  public static void banana() {
    long t = System.currentTimeMillis();

    // initial list size 16m records, block size 32 (storage is int[], so we
    // need 32 ints to hold 16 longs)
    net.yadan.banana.list.LinkedList list = new LinkedList(16 * 1024 * 1024, 16 * 2, 0);

    // initial fill in
    for (int i = 0; i < 16L * 1024 * 1024; i++) {
      list.appendTail(32); // similar to java list.add() which appends to the
                           // end of the list
    }

    // the main stuff
    for (int i = 0; i < 16L * 1024 * 1024; i++) {
      list.removeHead(); // similar to java list removeFirst()
      list.appendTail(32); // similar to java list.add() which appends to the
                           // end of the list
    }

    System.out.println("Banana : " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - t) + " ms elapsed");
    float GB = 1024 * 1024 * 1024;
    long total = Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory();
    long free = Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory();
    System.out
        .printf(
            "Banana : total: %5.1f GB,  free: %5.1f GB, used = %5.1f GB, Banana reports that it's actually using %5.1f GB\n",
            total / GB, free / GB, (total - free) / GB, list.computeMemoryUsage() / GB);
  }

  public static void java() {

    long t = System.currentTimeMillis();

    java.util.LinkedList<long[]> list = new java.util.LinkedList<long[]>();

    // initial fill in
    for (int i = 0; i < 16L * 1024 * 1024; i++) {
      list.add(new long[16]);
    }

    // the main stuff
    for (int i = 0; i < 16L * 1024 * 1024; i++) {
      list.removeFirst();
      list.add(new long[16]);
    }

    System.out.println("Java : " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - t) + " ms elapsed");
    float GB = 1024 * 1024 * 1024;
    long total = Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory();
    long free = Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory();
    System.out.printf("Java : total: %5.1f GB,  free: %5.1f GB, used = %5.1f GB\n", total / GB, free / GB,
        (total - free) / GB);
  }
}
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Could you please elaborate a bit on the internal mechanisms of memory management in banana? –  Maxim Zakharenkov Jul 16 '13 at 8:26
    
Please see the wiki, it's not big and will answer your questions (with pretty pictures too :). github.com/omry/banana/wiki –  Omry Yadan Jul 16 '13 at 8:30
    
If you have questions after reading the the relevant wiki pages let me know. –  Omry Yadan Jul 17 '13 at 4:47

You are going to run in a lot of troubles with linked lists.

When the GC starts to scan the heap to find live objects, it starts with the first element of your list and then iterates recursively through every single element. If your list has that many elements, it means the GC pauses will be long, no matter what.

You should declare your list as a Collection<long[]> and then try different implementations, such an ArrayDequeue of a manually crafted circular-array based on an ArrayList.

If I run your program as-is on my machine, I am getting Full GC, since it fills the heap faster than CMS is able to clean it. You cannot really start a JVM tuning exercise based on this small snippet.

Hope that helps !

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Your example is pretty much the pathological case for most garbage collectors. A much better solution to that problem is to use the Disruptor but I see from your comments that you do not want an alternative design suggestion.

If you provided a GC log there might be some CMS tuning options to make things a bit better but it is hard to tell without the logs. Are the pauses due to a FullGC or are they due to Remark phase for example? If a FullGC it might be that CMS is not starting early enough to keep up.

What is the real problem you are addressing because the contrived one seems a bit crazy?

If you want to have such a design pattern then the best JVM for you is Azul Zing.

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Full GC duration scales with the amount of object references.

You'll probably need 2 things to happen:

1) possible design changes

  • use array based collection like ArrayDeque (few effects)

  • serialize objects as they enter the queue. This is particular interesting if you want to send them outside anyway. This will reduce the Full GC to basically zero. checkout https://code.google.com/p/fast-serialization/ the OffHeapQueue (unreleased) for an example.

2) I have done some analysis with a synthetic application on how to tune GC for large static data. http://java-is-the-new-c.blogspot.com/ this might help or save some time

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In similar scenario we added as much memory via -Xmx option as twice of required amount and added -XX:CMSInitiatingOccupancyFraction=50 -XX:+UseCMSInitiatingOccupancyOnly options.

In this case JVM performs GC when old gen is 50% full (i.e. we force earlier GC) and it has enough free memory to do quick defragmentation.

Also, you may find these flags -XX:+CMSConcurrentMTEnabled -XX:+CMSScavengeBeforeRemark useful too.

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As other commenters have already pointed out your sample breaks a basic prerequisite of generational garbage collection which is "most objects die young". You keep all your objects live for a similar amount of time which makes generational GC inefficient.

If you really only want to tune the JVM to run the sample as it is I recommend you to switch to the ParNew collector (using -XX:+UseParNewGC) and make new generation rather small by setting -XX:NewSize and -XX:MaxNewSize both to something like 200m or 300m.

Note that no concurrent collector like CMS or G1 can help you here because there will always be a concurrent mode failure and a fallback to Full GCs. The (default in Java 7) ParallelGC collector will also deliver poor performance because it implicitly uses -XX:+UseParallelOldGC and traversal (for marking) of a single LinkedList is not suitable for parallelization.

I have just published a blog article showing (in figure 8, left side) a micro benchmark which seems very similar to yours. In this case, ParNewGC outperformed the other collectors by a wide margin.

Regards, Andreas

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I forgot to say that my advice will probably help you to improve the throughput of your sample but I do not know a way to keep pauses in the 100ms range with Oracle's Hotspot JVM and this sample. IMHO, pauses will always be in the seconds (up to tens of seconds range) with 6GB of heap and a brutal GC sample like that. –  Andreas Mueller Dec 23 '13 at 23:06

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