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I have the following code that works correctly. However after I add an else statement anything always evaluates to else

wgetstr(inputWin, ch); //get line and store in ch variable
    	str = ch;	       //make input from char* to string


    	if(str=="m" || str=="M"){
    		showFeedback("Data Memory Updated");
    	}
    	if(str=="p" || str=="P"){
    		showFeedback("Program Memory Updated");
    	}
    	if(str=="g" || str=="G"){
    		showFeedback("Accumulator, Program Counter, Zero Result Updated");
    	}
    	if(str=="e" || str=="E"){
    		showFeedback("Editing Mode Enabled");
    	}
    	if(str=="c" || str=="C"){
    		showFeedback("Program Copied Into Program Memory");
    	}
    	if(str=="r" || str=="R"){
    		showFeedback("Executing Program");
    	}
    	if(str=="x" || str=="X"){
    		showFeedback("Program Exited");
    	}

All the previous evaluates correctly based on what the input is. i.e If I enter "m" it calls the showeFeedback("Data Memory Updated") on so on, but if I add the following else statement, I always get "Invalid Command Entered" no matter what I enter.

else{
    		showFeedback("Invalid Command Entered");
    	}
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this is unrelated to your problem, but you might consider transforming your str to upper (or lower) case so that you don't have all those ||s in your conditionals. –  Mike Ellery Nov 19 '09 at 19:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

All of those are separate if-statements. The else you added only goes with the last one. Change all but the first if to else if and it should work like you expect.

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you're so right. I don't know how I did this. I'm not that noob. Thanks. –  user69514 Nov 19 '09 at 18:39

You need to use else if for everything except the first one.

So the simple change to your existing code:

    	if(str=="m" || str=="M"){
    		showFeedback("Data Memory Updated");
    	}
    	else if(str=="p" || str=="P"){
    		showFeedback("Program Memory Updated");
    	}
    	else if(str=="g" || str=="G"){
    		showFeedback("Accumulator, Program Counter, Zero Result Updated");
    	}
    	else if(str=="e" || str=="E"){
    		showFeedback("Editing Mode Enabled");
    	}
    	else if(str=="c" || str=="C"){
    		showFeedback("Program Copied Into Program Memory");
    	}
    	else if(str=="r" || str=="R"){
    		showFeedback("Executing Program");
    	}
    	else if(str=="x" || str=="X"){
    		showFeedback("Program Exited");
    	}
    	else
    	{
    		showFeedback("Invalid Command Entered");
    	}
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Another approach would be to use the switch statement that exists exactly for this kind of needs..

eg:

char str = ch[0];

switch (str)
{
    case 'm':
    case 'M': { showFeedback("Data Memory Updated"); break; }
    case 'p':
    case 'P': { showFeedback("Program Memory Updated"); break; }
    ....
    default: { showFeedback("Invalid Command Entered"); }
    /* default case is choosen if noone of the above is selected */
}

EDIT: just to explain your doubt in the comment, char str = ch[0] means take first character of the string and put it here.

if you want to check the complete string doing direct comparisons (with == or !=) is not adeguate: you should use strcmp(char* str1, char* str2) function that returns 0 if the two strings are equal.

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yes i tried that but if i enter something like "mem" it will call case 'm' for some reason –  user69514 Nov 19 '09 at 19:45
    
"some reason" is that checking just first character of a string won't assume anything about the rest.. so "m" or "mem" or "mwhatever" will be just the same. It's a sort of if string begins with 'm' character –  Jack Nov 20 '09 at 14:08
    
switch does not work for strings –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 20 '09 at 14:14
    
my snippet is not working on strings, actually. And as you can see there is "char str", next time before downvoting please try to get into the problem. –  Jack Nov 20 '09 at 15:41
    
Btw, this is C++, and I think the questioner's str is probably a string class, since the comment "make input from char* to string" suggests to me that "char*" and "string" are different things. So == and != should be adequate. I agree with the rest of this, though, switching on a char is the obvious thing since all commands a single-char. Could add a check that the input isn't longer than one char: your code processes "go" the same as "g", while the questioner's code rejects "go" as invalid. –  Steve Jessop Nov 20 '09 at 17:28

Because when you add the else, its against the if(str=="x" || str=="X") line - so anything that is not an X will hit the else statement.

I think what you want are to convert all those ifs to "else if", except the first one of course.

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One thing to note, you may want to use toupper to convert your string to uppercase so that you don't have to OR it with lowercase guesses, might make it a little faster.

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