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Can you define generics with safe types, as you can with c#?

E.g.

public bool Foo<T>() where T : struct { /* */ }

Typescript now has generics, but can I perform a similar action?

Thanks.

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up vote 25 down vote accepted

Ok it seems you can do this:

Foo<T extends IBar>() { /* */ }

And that seems to make all calls require the T to implement IBar.

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2  
+1 - spot on. This is taken from the Java implementation of generics - the extends keyword is used to constrain to either an interface or a class. – Sohnee Jul 15 '13 at 19:20
    
But it seems it does not enforce anything yet. – Tarion Jan 10 '14 at 19:38
1  
Note that if you want to constrain by interfaces, you use the extends keyword rather than the implements on. For example Foo<T extends IBar>. – Drew Noakes Oct 10 '14 at 21:27
    
@Tarion, it seems to work for me – Drew Noakes Oct 10 '14 at 21:28
1  
Note that it's not required for a type to "implement" the IBar interface, it must merely be compatible with it. – Panu Horsmalahti Mar 13 '15 at 12:47

I could not find anything in spec about this. http://www.typescriptlang.org/Content/TypeScript%20Language%20Specification.pdf

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Indeed, although It seems to still be possible. :) – Tim Jul 15 '13 at 13:57
    
Good find! I'll leave my answer here with our comments just in case someone else follow this trail. – Alex Dresko Jul 15 '13 at 14:15
2  
Ah it does exist in the documentation: 6.4 Generic Functions. – Tim Jul 15 '13 at 15:29
    
Oh wow. I'm blind. – Alex Dresko Jul 15 '13 at 20:03

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