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I have created a python (I m using 2.4) script to automatically create a virtual host in httpd.conf. But when I run it it gives the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "ApaPy2.py", line 2, in ?
    from io import open
ImportError: No module named io

This is my script

import os
from io import open
project = raw_input(u'Enter the name of project ')
domain = raw_input (u'Enter the domain ')
docroot = raw_input(u'Enter root folder ')

virtualhost=u"""
<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerAdmin abhishek.verma@laitkor.com
    DocumentRoot /""" +docroot+ u"""/""" +project+ u"""
    ServerName """ +project+ u""".""" +domain+ u""".com
    ErrorLog logs/""" +project+ u""".com-error_log
    CustomLog logs/""" +project+ u""".com-access_log common
</VirtualHost>"""

f = open(u'/etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf', u'a')
f.write(virtualhost)
f.close()
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The io module was introduced in Python 2.6, so it doesn't exist in 2.4. From the documentation:

New in version 2.6.

The open keyword should work fine for what you're doing here.

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Yes it worked. Thanks. –  Abhishek dot py Jul 15 '13 at 14:51

I've never used python 2.4, but the documentation says the io module has been added in the 2.6 version, so you can't import it in 2.4.

I'd assume open was already a built in function in 2.4, though, so simply removing the from io import open line should be enough.

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The io module doesn't exist in 2.4 (and you don't need it to use open in this case). I would also simplify your code to use string formatting using % instead:

project = raw_input(u'Enter the name of project ')
domain = raw_input (u'Enter the domain ')
docroot = raw_input(u'Enter root folder ')

virtualhost=u"""
<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerAdmin abhishek.verma@laitkor.com
    DocumentRoot /%(docroot)s/%(project)s
    ServerName %(project)s.%(domain)s.com
    ErrorLog logs/%(project)s.com-error_log
    CustomLog logs/%(project)s.com-access_log common
</VirtualHost>"""

f = open(u'/etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf', u'a')
f.write(virtualhost % dict(project=project, docroot=docroot, domain=domain)
f.close()
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Yes, this is perfect. Actually I have always worked on python 3 and so I was unaware of this fact. Thanks. –  Abhishek dot py Jul 15 '13 at 15:03

The io module didn't exist in Python 2.4. Your usage of open is simple, so you can omit that line and the open statement will still work correctly.

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