Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following html

<div class="row-updated">
    <div>
        <span>Title</span>
        <span>Some text here</span>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div>
        <span>Title</span>
        <span>Some text here</span>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div>
        <span>Title</span>
        <span>Some text here</span>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row-updated">
    <div>
        <span>Title</span>
        <span>Some text here</span>
    </div>
</div>

I want to update the text in the second span for each div with class 'row-updated'.

var updated = $('.row-updated span:eq(1)');

$.each( updated, function( key, value ) {
    $(this).text('New text here');
});

But this does not seem to update all rows. It updates the first but not the second.

share|improve this question
    
have you $(document).ready(function(){ }); in your code? –  enyce12 Jul 15 '13 at 14:33
    
@DamianFrizzi yes –  madphp Jul 15 '13 at 14:34
    
Why the .each() iteration? jQuery returns an Object! –  Bondye Jul 15 '13 at 14:50
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can achieve what you want like this:

var updated = $('.row-updated');

$.each( updated, function( key, value ) {
    $(this).find('span').eq(1).text('New text here');
});
share|improve this answer
3  
This sounds like the correct solution, since OP wants to select the second span for each div. I do not understand why this was down-voted either. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 15 '13 at 14:35
    
If the span will always be followed by another span (like in html example), my answer would be best since generate less overhead. But if OP can't assure the spans will not be side by side, this answer is the most correct. –  RaphaelDDL Jul 15 '13 at 14:43
    
@RaphaelDDL what happens if OP adds a third span to each row-updated won't they be selected as well in your solution? –  Yotam Omer Jul 15 '13 at 14:44
    
@YotamOmer Yup, third will as well (When evaluate on the first span, span + span would grab second. When evaluate on the second span, span + span would grab third). That's why I said "will always be followed by another span (like in html example)". If he can't assure the example html, then yours is the best :) –  RaphaelDDL Jul 15 '13 at 14:49
    
@RaphaelDDL gotcha :) thanks. –  Yotam Omer Jul 15 '13 at 14:50
show 1 more comment

.eq() doesn't do what you think it does. You need to use .nth-child() here.

// nth-child() is 1-indexed as @ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ  pointed out in the comment (thanks!).
var updated = $('.row-updated span:nth-child(2)');

$.each( updated, function( key, value ) {
    $(this).text('New text here');
});

.eq will return the nth element out of the whole set of results, not the nth span.

share|improve this answer
1  
nth-child isn't 0 indexed :P –  ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Jul 15 '13 at 14:37
    
@ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ thanks :) –  Dogbert Jul 15 '13 at 14:38
add comment

:eq() filters the entire jQuery collection of the .row-updated span selector.

Use this selector:

var updated = $('.row-updated span + span');

$.each( updated, function( key, value ) {
    $(this).text('New text here');
});

Explanation of selector: This selector grabs the span which is followed by another span inside .row-updated.

I think will run faster than actually using .find().eq() from the other answer since it's less function overhead (it's a css selector only).

Of course considering the second span is followed by the first or else you will need find and eq.

See my jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
add comment

Ok, because all answers still have that .each()...

You don't need the implicit iteration because jQuery is able to return a jQuery object.

So you can use:

var allMySecondSpans = $('.row-updated div span:nth-child(2)'); // Or 1 of the other ways
allMySecondSpans.text('New text here');
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.