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I'm trying to understand scope in nested classes in python. Here is my example code :

class OuterClass:
     outer_var = 1
     class InnerClass:
           inner_var = outer_var

The creation of class does not complete and I get the error :

<type 'exceptions.NameError'>: name 'outer_var' is not defined

trying inner_var = Outerclass.outer_var doesnt work I get <type 'exceptions.NameError'>: name 'OuterClass' is not defined

I am trying to access the static outer_var from InnerClass. Is there a way to do this?

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What you suggest in the last paragraph doesn't work. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 19 '09 at 19:22
    
@jorendoff . Thanks, I must have had a stale object in my interpreter when I tried it . Removed that line. –  user214870 Nov 19 '09 at 19:59

4 Answers 4

class Outer(object):
  outer_var = 1

  class Inner(object):
    @property
    def inner_var(self):
      return Outer.outer_var

This isn't quite the same as similar things work in other languages, and uses global lookup instead of scoping the access to outer_var. (If you change what object the name Outer is bound to, then this code will use that object the next time it is executed.)

If you instead want all Inner objects to have a reference to an Outer because outer_var is really an instance attribute:

class Outer(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self.outer_var = 1

  def get_inner(self):
    return self.Inner(self)
    # "self.Inner" is because Inner is a class attribute of this class
    # "Outer.Inner" would also work, or move Inner to global scope
    # and then just use "Inner"

  class Inner(object):
    def __init__(self, outer):
      self.outer = outer

    @property
    def inner_var(self):
      return self.outer.outer_var

Note that nesting classes is somewhat uncommon in Python, and doesn't automatically imply any sort of special relationship between the classes. You're better off not nesting. (You can still set a class attribute on Outer to Inner, if you want.)

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1  
It might be helpful to add with which version(s) of python your answer will work. –  AJ. Nov 19 '09 at 19:00
1  
I wrote this with 2.6/2.x in mind, but, looking at it, I see nothing that wouldn't work the same in 3.x. –  Roger Pate Nov 19 '09 at 19:07
    
I don't quite understand what you mean in this part, "(If you change what object the name Outer is bound to, then this code will use that object the next time it is executed.)" Can you please help me understand? –  batbrat Mar 28 at 9:55
    
@batbrat it means that the reference to Outer is looked up anew every time you do Inner.inner_var. So if you rebind the name Outer to a new object, Inner.inner_var will start returning that new object. –  Felipe Nov 20 at 13:44

I think you can simply do:

class OuterClass:
    outer_var = 1

    class InnerClass:
        pass
    InnerClass.inner_var = outer_var

The problem you encountered is due to this:

A block is a piece of Python program text that is executed as a unit. The following are blocks: a module, a function body, and a class definition.
(...)
A scope defines the visibility of a name within a block.
(...)
The scope of names defined in a class block is limited to the class block; it does not extend to the code blocks of methods – this includes generator expressions since they are implemented using a function scope. This means that the following will fail:

   class A:  

       a = 42  

       b = list(a + i for i in range(10))

http://docs.python.org/reference/executionmodel.html#naming-and-binding

The above means:
a function body is a code block and a method is a function, then names defined out of the function body present in a class definition do not extend to the function body.

Paraphrasing this for your case:
a class definition is a code block, then names defined out of the inner class definition present in an outer class definition do not extend to the inner class definition.

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Amazing. Your example fails, claiming "global name 'a' is not defined". Yet substituting a list comprehension [a + i for i in range(10)] successfully binds A.b to the expected list [42..51]. –  George Jan 8 '12 at 20:50
2  
@George Note that the example with class A isn't mine, it is from the Python official doc whose I gave link. This example fails and that failure is what is wanted to be shown in this example. In fact list(a + i for i in range(10)) is list((a + i for i in range(10))) that is to say list(a_generator). They say a generator is implemented with a similar scope than the scope of functions. –  eyquem Jan 8 '12 at 23:01
    
@George For me, that means that functions act differently according if they are in a module or in a class. In the first case, a function goes outside to find the object binded to a free identifier. In the second case, a function, that is to say a method, doesn't go outside its body. Functions in a module and methods in a class are in reality two kinds of objects. Methods are not just functions in class. That's my idea. –  eyquem Jan 8 '12 at 23:01
2  
@George: FWIW, neither the list(...) call nor comprehension work in Python 3. The documentation for Py3 is also slightly different reflecting this. It now says "The scope of names defined in a class block is limited to the class block; it does not extend to the code blocks of methods – this includes comprehensions and generator expressions since they are implemented using a function scope." (emphasis mine). –  martineau Jan 29 '13 at 16:00

You might be better off if you just don't use nested classes. If you must nest, try this:

x = 1
class OuterClass:
    outer_var = x
    class InnerClass:
        inner_var = x

Or declare both classes before nesting them:

class OuterClass:
    outer_var = 1

class InnerClass:
    inner_var = OuterClass.outer_var

OuterClass.InnerClass = InnerClass

(After this you can del InnerClass if you need to.)

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Easiest solution:

class OuterClass:
     outer_var = 1
     class InnerClass:
           inner_var = OuterClass.outer_var

It requires you to be explicit, but doesn't take much effort.

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