Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why I am getting extra char while writing into file for the following code? If I am using writeBytes(String) than the below code is working file. Then what is the problem with dos.writeChars() method?

File fileObj = new File("student.txt");

try {

  // writing into file
  FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(fileObj);
  String msg = "This is student file";

  DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(fos);
  dos.writeChars(msg);

  //reading from file
  FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(fileObj);
  DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(fis);

  System.out.println(dis.readLine());

  for (int i = 0; ((i = dis.read()) != -1); i++) {
    System.out.println(i);
  }

  fos.close();
  dos.close();

} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
  System.err.println("File not found!");
} catch (IOException e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Jarrod Roberson, Uwe Plonus, demongolem, Rico, Michael Roland Apr 16 '14 at 16:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Jarrod Roberson, Uwe Plonus
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What output are you expecting? What output are you getting? –  Adrian Jandl Jul 15 '13 at 14:37
    
I am expecting "This is student file", but I am getting some extra char after every char like T[]h[]i[]s[].... –  Vishrant Jul 15 '13 at 14:39
    
For starters, close the outputstream before you open the inputstream. –  Adrian Jandl Jul 15 '13 at 14:41
    
I did but the same result persists. –  Vishrant Jul 15 '13 at 14:44
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved –  demongolem Apr 16 '14 at 13:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

writeChars() uses 2-byte chars (UTF-16). So each char you write will result in two bytes written.

If you want another encoding use getBytes() on the String and write it as bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
If you want to continue to use UTF-16, you can always prefix the output with the UTF-16 byte order mark (0xFEFF). This will trigger your text editor to read the bytes correctly. –  Duncan Jul 15 '13 at 14:48
    
suppose i am writing some String like "This is student file" then its size is 20bytes and when i am using writeChars() then it will write 40bytes of data. My ques actually is, what is the size of string before writing and after writing into file. –  Vishrant Jul 15 '13 at 14:49
    
In Java, a String is built up from chars, which are 2 bytes each. So the string has been 20 chars and 40 bytes all the time. –  Erik Ekman Jul 15 '13 at 14:53
    
i did not understand Erik what do you mean by "you can always prefix the output with the UTF-16 byte order mark (0xFEFF)" please elaborate –  Vishrant Jul 15 '13 at 14:54
    
The byte order mark is used to tell the reader the encoding and endianness of the coming data. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark –  Erik Ekman Jul 15 '13 at 15:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.