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I have a script which runs as a standalone program, however I'd like to be able to use it as a callable function as well. Currently when i try and run it from another script, i get errors saying that certain modules are not defined/imported. For example:

NameError: global name 'exp' is not defined

Here's an example of my code that produces the error:

from PostREC3 import *            ##import the required functions from the module    

from numpy import array, shape, math, loadtxt, log10, vstack, arange
from scipy.integrate import quad       
from pylab import all                
from numpy import pi as pi           
from assimulo.solvers.sundials import IDA 
from assimulo.problem import Implicit_Problem
from math import exp, log10, fabs, atan, log
import pickle
import sys

results = PostREC(2,100,90,1.0,1, 1,"0",2 )  #run an imported function

output:

NameError: global name 'exp' is not defined

I've tried importing exp from within the function itself, however that doesn't change anything. As far as I'm aware, as long as I've imported them before using the function then they should be available for any other functions to use. So, is there something wrong with what I'm doing, or does this point to another error within the code itself?

O/S: Ubuntu 12.10 Python 2.7 64 bit

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Show us the complete traceback and the PostREC.PostREC definition. Imported functions use their originating module as the global namespace. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 15 '13 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

Import exp and any other module/function you need at the top of your PostREC3 module, not whithin a particular function.

Imports are not "global", each module needs to import everything it needs to run, even if another module already did so.

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