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I am new to ESB's and was reading an older book on Mule and ServiceMix.

After a bit of research, and looking at FuseSource docs which state that JBI is deprecated in favour of OSGi services, am I correct in assuming that for integration purposes :-

  1. ServiceMix ESB is (nowadays) mainly Camel running in an OSGi container

  2. Services can be deployed as OSGi bundles, and Camel can somehow use these services where it would otherwise uses POJOs to do custom processing

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

My two cents: ServiceMix is a "ready-made" integration container for JAVA. It packs together a number of features on top of an OSGI runtime (Apache Karaf), of whom highlights:

  • Apache Camel – EIP framework
  • Apache ActiveMQ – messaging

So:

  1. ServiceMix ESB is (nowadays) mainly an OSGI container including Camel (as well as ActiveMQ, CXF, ...)
  2. Everything is deployed as OSGI bundles.
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I like el.atomo s answer but I'll add for question 2:

  1. Services can be deployed as OSGi bundles, and Camel can somehow use these services where it would otherwise uses POJOs to do custom processing

Camel itself is just POJOs. Based on the servicemix camel guide, each OSGI bundle is going to have it's own CamelContext. NMR (or TCP or HTTP or JMS or whatever camel component you use) is used to communicate between the specific OSGI bundles and camel routes which sit in different OSGI bundles (and therefore different CamelContexts)

The biggest difference between vanilla OSGi with camel setup inside it and Servicemix is probably the inclusion ActiveMQ, NMR, and BPMN2.

References: http://servicemix.apache.org/docs/4.5.x/ http://servicemix.apache.org/docs/4.5.x/nmr/nmr-camel.html http://servicemix.apache.org/docs/4.5.x/camel/camel-guide.pdf

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