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Right now I am creating a load of classes that will hold my configuration and that is it. All I do is store the values from the configuration file.

More than half the code is the getters and I am wondering whether the practice is still to have the getters or just access the variables directly.

So this:

public myClass
{
    public myClass(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    final String name;

    public final String getName()
    {
        return name;
    }
}

Or:

public myClass
{
    public myClass(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public final String name;
}

It seems really silly to have all the getters there when they are not actually doing anything but return the variable. But I have been told that it is common Java practice to have the getter in there anyways.

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1  
The compiler will inline them anyway. Although I would utilize java.util.Properties for what you are doing. –  jlordo Jul 15 '13 at 16:28
2  
With final variables, it may look silly, but if you have non-final variables and subclass have same variable name defined, and you try to access these variables, then you will see how confused it would be without get/set. Proper encapsulation is always best practice. –  Nambari Jul 15 '13 at 16:28
    
@jlordo it was a VERY simple example I was giving. Properties is in no way suitable for what I am doing :) –  Cheetah Jul 15 '13 at 16:34
    
btw should be better as private your 1st example –  nachokk Jul 15 '13 at 16:36
1  
Seeing the responses advocating getters/setters, I would like to say, that the newest Bean handling, also works without getters, immediately on the fields. And blindly using getters and especially setters might even be an antipattern in some cases. If you can get away with them, go for the economic direct fields. Maybe later refactoring to getters/setters. –  Joop Eggen Jul 15 '13 at 16:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Encapsulating the data with getters can provide several advantages, including:

  • You can change the field to some other representation, without affecting callers.
  • You can add additional code in the getter.
  • You can implement an interface that provides the getters.
  • You can provide read-only access to the fields even if they weren't final.
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1  
The most important reason to do this is for coupling which you explained in your answer. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 15 '13 at 16:31
    
@LuiggiMendoza Could you further explain coupling with regards to getters/setters? –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 15 '13 at 16:36
2  
Having more code couple to the representation of the class makes it more work to change that representation. Encapsulation hides the internal representation behind an interface, which can remain constant as the representation changes. –  Andy Thomas Jul 15 '13 at 16:40
    
@KevinBowersox check the last comment of Andy. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 15 '13 at 16:41

The practise I know is that you may use public static final fields with immutable types, like System.out for instance. I do add getters to instance fields, however.

I agree with you though that there is barely harm exposing a final String. Beware of mutable types, though. Furthermore, since there's inlining and code generation in the IDE the costs of the getters tend to be rather litte, both writing code and at runtime.

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