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I have three datasets and would like co know how much N was used in my calculations.

I read the data into a multi-dimensional array with dimensions (nx, ny, ntsteps, ndatasets), e.g. with a smaller example dataset:

      # nx   ny   nsteps ndatasets
            dat = runif(20 * 30 * 100 *  3)
        dim(dat) = c(20, 30, 100, 3)
        > str(dat)
    num [1:20, 1:30, 1:100, 1:3] 0.1834 0.8537 0.0672 0.0734 0.8078 ...

we take advantage of the cor functions and build this function to compute how many N we have:

    cor_withN <- function(...) {
        res <- try(cor.test(...)$parameter+2, silent=TRUE)
        ifelse(class(res)=="try-error", NA, res)}

Now we take advantage of the fact that apply also works on multi-dimensional arrays, not only matrices:

We use apply to iterate over all the x,y,z triples.

      result = apply(dat, c(1,2), function(x) cor_withN(x[,1], x[,2],x[,3]))
     > str(cor_result)
     logi [1:20, 1:30] NA NA NA NA NA NA ..

so something is wrong by getting NA NA NA NA if the last line went well! then

     str(cor_result)   

should be

     logi [1:20, 1:30] 100 100 100 100 100 ..(nsteps)

Any idea on why I am getting NA or is there another way to do it?

When I tested it with 2 datsets,it went well!

      cor_result = apply(dat, c(1,2), function(x) cor_withN(x[,1], x[,2]))
      > str(cor_result)
     num [1:20, 1:30] 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

so the problem is when I added x[,3]!! Thanks

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3  
I'm sorry, but cor.test as far I know takes two arguments, but you are passing it three arguments. How is that supposed to work? –  January Jul 15 '13 at 17:37
    
I am trying but I am not sure if we can make it work. Is there any other way to compute the N of triples like cor.test for three arguments!! –  sacvf Jul 15 '13 at 17:38
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "N of triples". Total number of combinations? There are simpler ways than calculating the correlation coefficient for that. –  January Jul 15 '13 at 17:48
    
yes I meant the Total number of combinations(the length of the vector) –  sacvf Jul 15 '13 at 17:52
    
I'm not entirely sure what you are trying to achieve here. cor.test is a function to test the significance of the correlation coefficient between two vectors of the same length. The parameter in the result is the number of degrees of freedom which is always equal to the length of the vector minus 2. How is that supposed to have anything to do with the number of combinations? (what combinations?) Please give some examples along with what you expect the function to return. –  January Jul 15 '13 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using this , you can do the following for example:

corpij <- function(i,j,data) {
             res <- tryCatch(cor.test(data[,i],data[,j])$parameter+2,
                    error = function(e) NA)

corp <- Vectorize(corpij, vectorize.args=list("i","j"))
result = apply(dat, c(1,2), 
               function(x) outer(1:ncol(x),1:ncol(x), corp,data=x))

outer will perform all the columns combinations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked well but the dim of the results was not correct. Look at thisstr(result) num [1:9, 1:20, 1:30] 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 ... –  sacvf Jul 15 '13 at 18:05
    
@sacvf I edit my answer. –  agstudy Jul 15 '13 at 18:06
    
the dim of the results was not correct. Look at thisstr(result) `num [1:9, 1:20, 1:30] 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100`` –  sacvf Jul 15 '13 at 18:14
    
Where the dim [1:9 came from? –  sacvf Jul 15 '13 at 18:14
1  
Good grief. +1 for patience! –  Simon O'Hanlon Jul 15 '13 at 20:37

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