Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does Ruby provide any mechanism to allow an iterator to yield all values from another iterator? (or "subiterator", I'm not sure what the proper name is). Similar to Python3.3+'s yield from

def f
    yield 'a'
    yield 'b'
end

def g
   # yield everything from f
   yield 'c'
   yield 'd'
end
share|improve this question
    
f { |x| yield x } too long? :) –  Joachim Isaksson Jul 15 '13 at 18:04
    
@JoachimIsaksson if f yields multiple values it starts to be –  Ryan Haining Jul 15 '13 at 18:33
    
though I suppose {|*x| yield x} be okay but idk if there are any subtleties to that I'm missing. But I was looking for something that handles all the things that can happen in normal interactions with iterators (exceptions and whatnot) without anything special –  Ryan Haining Jul 15 '13 at 19:04
2  
yield means and does something different in both languages. –  steenslag Jul 15 '13 at 19:13
    
I was not aware that yield was equivalent to just calling the block, thanks –  Ryan Haining Jul 15 '13 at 22:20
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is probably the most idiomatic approach:

def f
  yield 'a'
  yield 'b'
end

def g(&block)
  f(&block)
  yield 'c'
  yield 'd'
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

One way is this:

def f
  yield 'a'
  yield 'b'
end

def g
 f &Proc.new # 'duplicate' the block given to g and pass it to f
 yield 'c'
 yield 'd'
end
share|improve this answer
    
I had no idea that was possible. Can you give some reference? why Proc.new is the duplicate of the block and not an empty proc? it looks somewhat cryptic at first sight. –  tokland Jul 15 '13 at 19:31
2  
The docs specify this behaviour :). –  nicooga Jul 15 '13 at 19:40
1  
That's sad because I searched the docs, read those lines, and failed to connect the dots :-( I am afraid that's just too implicit for my taste. I don't recall finding code that uses "feature" either, so I guess I am not the only one. It perfectly answers the question, though, so +1 –  tokland Jul 15 '13 at 19:48
    
Anyone interested in the use of & above should check out: ablogaboutcode.com/2012/01/04/the-ampersand-operator-in-ruby –  Jonah Jul 15 '13 at 20:14
1  
@Ryan I tested that just now. It seems like neither methods duplicate the block. The blocks have same hash. –  nicooga Jul 16 '13 at 13:58
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.