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Hello everyone I recently started using C# with unity for game development and things are coming along quite well. The problem I'm having isn't with the functionality of my code but it's more in the style of coding it. I studied ANSI C for 4 years through high school so now as I jump to C# I really can't wrap my head around using pre-made classes (besides ones that I used in C which were called libraries). At this point my code looks very similar to C with some effort at implementing OOP principles. I'm afraid that if another C# developer looked at this code, they would call it sloppy and unreadable (my C code isn't really the most elegant anyway as you'll see). I've been a lone wolf trying my best to teach myself in hopes of becoming an indie developer. so I don't have experience with team based assignments. Here's a sample of a method in my application:

    public void create_item(string item_name,char L_M_H,int item_cat)//function not finshed july 13th 2013 8:07pm other fuel items need to be finished. due july 14th 10:00pm
    {
        int i = 0;
        if(item_cat == FUEL)
        {
            print("item_cat is fuel");
            if(L_M_H == L)
            {
                for(i = 0;i < 5;i++)
                {//increments if fuel index has a value
                    if(l_fuel[i] != null)
                        continue;
                    if(l_fuel[i] == null)
                    {
                        l_fuel[i] = item_name;
                        Debug.Log (string.Format("Low Class Fuel: {0} Created",l_fuel[i]));
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            if(L_M_H == M)
            {
                for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
                {
                    if(m_fuel[i] != null)
                    {
                        continue;
                    }
                    if(m_fuel[i] == null)
                    {
                        m_fuel[i] = item_name;

                    }
                }
            }
        }

    }

I'm sure there's a better way to perform functions like this in C#, however is it worth it to stop development to use classes and C# specific types like List to perform these tasks? I'm very interested in getting opinions from seasoned programmers as I'm a total noob in C# and OOP.

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closed as too broad by Chris Sinclair, Paul Annetts, CanSpice, Randy Levy, Steven Jul 15 '13 at 21:35

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Off the top of my head, int item_cat/FUEL, L_M_H/L/M should be enumeration types. Also, not sure what's going on with m_fuel and l_fuel. (EDIT: Also, generally speaking, it's rare to have null entries in a collection. But I'm not sure what the context here is, so I can't comment if that should be changed.) In general, yes, pick up some books or check out some online tutorials on C# OOP in general. Start small. You'll be far better for it. – Chris Sinclair Jul 15 '13 at 20:36
2  
The classes in .net are not there to make our job as programmers harder. They're there to make it easier. You will be doing yourself a favor by understanding and using them where appropriate. They're also, for the most part, thoughtfully implemented, and well tested. – hatchet Jul 15 '13 at 20:39
    
Whats up with all of the negative ratings. I clearly said i'm not very experienced I just wanted sugestions which i did recieve and apprciate. Would it have been better not to ask?Thanks for the help, sorry if this question was beneath some of you seasoned developers... – Brian Martin Jul 15 '13 at 22:13

Yes, your code is sloppy and unreadable.

1 - Respect the C# Naming Conventions:

Your method and member names should be ProperCased, so it's public void CreateItem()

2 - Do not use primitive types where they don't belong.

Both parameters char L_M_H and int item_cat seem to be used here to emulate Enums.

3 - As other have mentioned in comments, your m_fuel and l_fuel things look strange. Make sure you create a proper data model to represent your data.

4 - Do not use for to iterate collections. Use foreach or LINQ.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll go against your number 4, as he is changing the item at that index. Foreach and LINQ shouldn't have side effects on the collection it's iterating through (well, they can in any way other than direct assignment, but that is generally frowned upon in all but the most overt cases). – Tory Jul 15 '13 at 20:44
1  
@Tory right, but most probably because of a poor data model. – HighCore Jul 15 '13 at 20:45
public interface IFuelUpdater {
    void UpdateFuelItemContainerSlots(string[] container, string itemName);
}

public class MediumOrLowFuelUpdater : IFuelUpdater {

    public void UpdateFuelItemContainerSlots(string[] container, string itemName){
        for(i = 0; i < container.Length; i++)
            {
                if(container[i] == null)
                {
                    container[i] = item_name;
                }
            }
    }
}

   // elsewhere

   IFuelUpdater updater = new MediumOrLowFuelUpdater();
   string[] mediumContainer = new string[6];
   string[] lowContainer = new string[6];

   updater.UpdateFuelItemSlots(mediumContainer, "*Name Goes Here*");
   updater.UpdateFuelItemSlots(lowContainer, "*Low Name Goes Here*");

This is how your code might look if it were made more OOP. This example is pretty nonsensical. I imagine that you really only have only one logical "fuel" array but perhaps you are forced to have two in your code because of some improper design elsewhere or some pre-optimization.

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Thank you for the suggestion,i'm still having trouble with OOP however. What makes it better over Procedual coding? – Brian Martin Jul 15 '13 at 22:18
    
The same flavor of reasons that make C "better" than Assembler. Primarily because OOP is more modular than procedural. Business clients who are more interested in a stable, maintainable, and extensible application over shaving CPU cycles prefer OOP. – Keith Payne Jul 16 '13 at 17:56

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