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As per my knowledge Singleton Design Pattern means we can only create one SINGLE OBJECT of a class.

The following code is running successfully without any error/exception.

I expect the code to fail because the SingletonExample class has a private default constructor.

public class SingletonExample {
    private static SingletonExample singletonInstance;

    private SingletonExample() {
    }

    public static SingletonExample getSingletonInstance() {
        if (null == singletonInstance) {
            System.out.println("Creating new instance");
            singletonInstance = new SingletonExample();
        }
        return singletonInstance;
    }

    public void printSingleton(){
        System.out.println("Inside print Singleton");
    }

    public static void main(String a[])  {
        SingletonExample singObj1 = new SingletonExample();
        SingletonExample singObj2 = new SingletonExample();
    }
}

Is there something wrong with my code?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 15 '13 at 20:31

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
You might want to check some other methods for singleton generation. Double check locking isn't the best of them. –  MichaelT Jul 15 '13 at 18:55
3  
You are not even calling your getSingletonInstance() method that you made. –  chancea Jul 15 '13 at 19:31
    
If you can do new SingletonExample(), it's not a Singleton. –  Ross Patterson Jul 15 '13 at 22:09

4 Answers 4

Because your main method is in the class SingletonExample, the main code can access the private constructor.

Try moving your main method to another class.

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Your calling singleton class's private constructor in same class so your able to access the constructor else you can't. Design patterns will define rules to avoid normal human errors only.

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the intent of the singleton pattern is to control the number of instances and you have done the correctly. only this class can make instances, so just make only one.

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Use enum instead of class. And no one will be able to replace your instance:

public enum SingletonExample {
    singletonInstance;

    private SingletonExample() {
        System.out.println("Creating new instance");          
    }

    public static void main(String a[])  {

    }
}
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