Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a Mongoid query for records that match a certain date range, or have nil values. Here is my ruby code that performs the function that I would like to turn into a Mongoid query:

class MyModel
  include Mongoid::Document
  field :name
  field :enabled, type: Boolean, default: false
  field :start_date, type: DateTime
  field :end_date, type: DateTime

  def self.active
    documents = where(enabled: true)
    documents = documents.keep_if {|doc| doc.start_date.nil? || doc.start_date <= Date.today}
    documents = documents.keep_if {|doc| doc.end_date.nil? || doc.end_date >= Date.tomorrow}
    documents
  end
end

How can I improve performance by turning this method into a Mongoid query?

Update:

Here is the RSpec test that I'm using to verify the correct behavior:

describe '.active' do
  let!(:disabled){ Fabricate(:model, enabled: false, name: 'disabled') }
  let!(:enabled_without_date){ Fabricate(:active_model, name: 'enabled_without_date') }
  let!(:past){ Fabricate(:active_model, start_date: 1.week.ago, end_date: Date.yesterday, name: 'past') }
  let!(:current){ Fabricate(:active_model, start_date: Date.today, end_date: Date.tomorrow, name: 'current') }
  let!(:future){ Fabricate(:active_model, start_date: Date.tomorrow, end_date: 1.week.from_now, name: 'future') }

  it 'returns only enabled and within the current time' do
    MyModel.count.should == 5
    models = MyModel.active.to_a
    models.should_not be_empty
    models.should_not include disabled
    models.should_not include past
    models.should_not include future
    models.should include enabled_without_date
    models.should include current
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Mongoid OR query syntax –  hauleth Jul 15 '13 at 20:45
1  
I've updated my question with a working code sample that I would like to turn into a query. –  Andrew Jul 15 '13 at 22:52
    
Your specs look for models in the date range, whereas your active method searches for documents outside the date range. Which is the desired behavior? –  Chris Heald Jul 22 '13 at 19:16
    
@ChrisHeald I think you need to take a second look. In order for a document to be "active" it must have a start date that is in the past or today (or nil) and an end date that is after today (or nil). –  Andrew Jul 23 '13 at 3:13
    
Aha, I see. Not sure what I was thinking earlier! I'll amend my answer to cover that. –  Chris Heald Jul 23 '13 at 3:15

6 Answers 6

Maybe this will do the trick:

where(
  enabled: true,
  {:$or => [{start_date: nil}, {:start_date.lte => Date.today.to_time   }]},
  {:$or => [{end_date:   nil}, {:end_date.gte   => Date.tomorrow.to_time}]}
)
share|improve this answer
    
hmm...still having trouble with this. your answer doesn't seem to solve it for me. –  Andrew Jul 15 '13 at 21:35
    
Sorry my answer was bogus, i actually switched around the ors and and... Please see my edit and let me know if it works –  Patrick Oscity Jul 15 '13 at 21:47
    
Updated again because i think mongoid uses :$or, not "$or" –  Patrick Oscity Jul 15 '13 at 21:49
    
I think either one is valid, but still didn't fix it. It only returned the records where both dates were nil, but didn't return the ones with a date range specified. –  Andrew Jul 15 '13 at 21:57
    
Strange. Sorry i couldn't help here. –  Patrick Oscity Jul 15 '13 at 22:09

Use below code:

where(:enabled => true, :$or => [{:start_date => nil}, {:start_date =>['$lte' => Date.today]}], :$or => [{:end_date => nil}, {:end_date =>['$gte' =>Date.tomorrow]}])

Hope this help you.

share|improve this answer

If you convert the criteria:

(start <= X OR start.nil?) AND (end >= Y OR end.nil?)

into the disjunctive form, you get:

(start <= X AND end >= Y) OR (start <= X and end.nil?) OR (start.nil? and end >= Y) or (start.nil? and end.nil?)

You can then express this via a single $or clause:

$or: [
  {:start_date.lte => start_date, :end_date.gte => end_date},
  {:start_date => nil, :end_date.gte => end_date},
  {:start_date.lte => start_date, :end_date => nil},
  {:start_date => nil, :end_date => nil},
]

If both values must be either set or nil (that is, you can't have one set and one nil), this becomes even simpler:

$or: [
  {:start_date.lte => start_date, :end_date.gte => end_date},
  {:start_date => nil},
]

To meet your spec, the full query would be:

Model.where({
  :enabled => true,
  :$or => [
    {:start_date.lte => Date.today.to_time, :end_date.gte => Date.tomorrow.to_time},
    {:start_date => nil},
  ]
})
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, it's still only returning the "enabled_without_date" record. It should also include the "current" record. –  Andrew Jul 24 '13 at 21:01
    
You may be running into date resolution issues; Mongo only stores Javascript Date types, which are full-resolution down to the millisecond. Can you compare the query generated with the actual data in the DB? –  Chris Heald Jul 24 '13 at 21:08

All answers given so far seem alright to me. However I'll add another syntax variant that has worked for me in previous projects, which also takes care of the redundant $or key scenario, which seems a little fishy to me (but maybe doing that is totally ok anyway).

Document.where({
   '$and' => [
       :enabled => true,
       '$or' => [
           :start_date => nil,
           :start_date => { '$lte' => Date.today.to_time }
       ],
       '$or' => [
           :end_date => nil,
           :end_date => { '$gte' => Date.tomorrow.to_time }
       ]
    ]
})

In terms of further advice: Have you reviewed your spec as well? (You never know ... ;)). Also make sure to debug and test only parts of the problem, e.g. get the :enabled filter working on it's own, get the date filters working on their own, get the nil filters working on their own, and then try to combine them again - Maybe that will lead you to the core of the problem. Also I'm seeing different variants of specifying the Date that $lte and $gte are compared against here. I myself had success with providing a Time class to compare against, make sure to experiment with that as well!

share|improve this answer

Using

Document.where(
  enabled: true,
  '$or' => [
    { start_date: nil },
    { :start_date.lte => Date.today.to_time }
  ],
  '$or' => [
    { end_date: nil },
    { :end_date.gte => Date.tomorrow.to_time }
  ]
).each do |d|
  puts d.inspect
end

I was able to get

[2] pry(main)> load './documents.rb'
#<Document _id: 51e89c690e21d8ab0d9cf012, enabled: true, start_date: nil, end_date: nil>
#<Document _id: 51e8a2e62147b4bfb5f12c65, enabled: true, start_date: 2012-02-01 05:00:00 UTC, end_date: 2014-02-01 05:00:00 UTC>
#<Document _id: 51e8a4797372723f449765bd, enabled: true, start_date: nil, end_date: 2014-02-01 05:00:00 UTC>
=> true

Update

You are right. My answer was completely bogus. The second $or key would have overridden the first. However, even wrapping the entire thing with $and (thus using an array of hashes) doesn't help - mongoid could be preventing multiple $or conditions.

On a brighter note, Chris Heald's solution works. Here is a complete proof. Run it with rspec mongoid_query.rb.

start_date = Date.today
end_date = Date.tomorrow
where(
  enabled: true,
  :$or => [
    {:start_date.lte => start_date, :end_date.gte => end_date},
    {:start_date => nil, :end_date.gte => end_date},
    {:start_date.lte => start_date, :end_date => nil},
    {:start_date => nil, :end_date => nil},
  ]
)
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting...I'm surprised to see that using the same $or hash key does not overwrite the previous $or. Not sure if it makes a difference, but the start_date/end_date fields are specified as DateTime –  Andrew Jul 22 '13 at 18:06
    
Also, your answer is a different solution than the solution that @padde provided. Your answer passes a single hash, while padde passes three hashes. –  Andrew Jul 22 '13 at 18:09
    
Unfortunately, this still isn't passing my tests. I updated my question to include the test I'm using to verify the solution. –  Andrew Jul 22 '13 at 18:23
    
You are right! I updated my solution. –  Jim Lim Jul 25 '13 at 13:41

It appears to be a limitation in the mongodb driver itself! Just using the mongodb java shell I created three records:

db.so.insert({s:0,e:10})
db.so.insert({s:10,e:20})
db.so.insert({s:20,e:30})

then tried the following queries:

db.so.find({s:{$lte:15}, e:{$gte:15}})  
   ==> finds just the middle record - correct
db.so.find({s:{$lte:15}, $or:[{e:{$exists:false}},{e:{$gte:15}}]})  
   ==> finds just the middle record - correct
db.so.find({$or:[{s:{$exists:false}},{s:{$lte:15}}], $or:[{e:{$exists:false}},{e:{$gte:15}}]})
   ==> finds both the middle and the last record - OOPS
db.so.find({$or:[{s:{$exists:false}},{$and:[{s:{$lte:15}},{e:{$gte:15}}]}]})
   ==> finds just the middle record - correct

I presume this means you cannot use more than one $or at the same level (as it says you can nest them). I will post this as a question on the mongodb site and see whether they agree. In the meantime, in your case the fourth query points the way to a possible work round, though Chris Heald has already suggested almost the same:

Model.where({
    :enabled => true,
    :$or => [
        {:start_date => nil},
        :$and => [
            {:start_date.lte => Date.today.to_time}, 
            {:end_date.gte => Date.tomorrow.to_time}
        ]
    ]
})
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.