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I'm working on a program for Project Euler to add all the digits of 2^1000. So far I've been able to track the program segmentation faults when it reaches around 5 digits and tries to push a one onto the vector at line 61 in the function carry().

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class MegaNumber
{
        vector<int> data; //carries an array of numbers under ten, would be char but for simplicity's sake
        void multiplyAssign(int operand, int index); //the recursive function called by the *= operator
        void carry(int index);//if one of the data entries becomes more than ten call this function
    public:
        void printNumber(); //does what it says on the can
        void operator*=(MegaNumber operand);
        void operator*=(int operand);
        void operator+=(int operand);
        MegaNumber(string);
        unsigned long int AddAllDigits();//returns the value of all of the digits summed
};

MegaNumber::MegaNumber(string operand)
{
    for(int i= operand.size()-1; i>=0;i--) //run it into the memory smallest digit first
    {
        data.push_back(operand[i]-48); //converts a text char to an int
    }
}

void MegaNumber::printNumber()
{
    int temp = data.size();
    for(unsigned int i=(temp); i>0;--i)
    {
     cout << (int)data[i-1];
    }
}

void MegaNumber::operator*=(int operand)
{
    if(operand > 9)
    {
        cout << "function does not yet deal with large ints than 9";
    }
    else multiplyAssign(operand, 0);
}

void MegaNumber::multiplyAssign(int operand, int index)
{
    data[index] *=operand;
    if(index<data.size()) multiplyAssign(operand, index+1);
    if(data[index] > 9) carry(index);
}

void MegaNumber::carry(int index)
{

    int temp = (data[index] / 10); //calculate the amount to carry
    if(data.size()==index+1)
    {
     data.push_back(temp);//if there is no upper digit push it onto the stack
    }
    else
    {
        data[index+1]+=temp; //else add it to the next digit

        if(data[index+1]>9) carry(index+1); //rinse and repeat
    }
     data[index]-=temp*10; //remove what's been carried
}

unsigned long int MegaNumber::AddAllDigits() //does what it says on the can
{
    unsigned long int Dagger = 0;
    for(int i=0; i<data.size();i++) Dagger+=data[i];
    return Dagger;
}

int main()
{
    MegaNumber A("2");
    A.printNumber();
    cout << "\n";
    for(unsigned int i=0; i<20; i++) A*=2;
    A.printNumber();
    cout << "\n";
    cout << A.AddAllDigits() << "\n";
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
    return 0;
}

What may be causing this?

share|improve this question
    
What is the idea of using recursion in multiplyAssign. This is could cause the stack overflow for a large arrays –  Elalfer Nov 19 '09 at 21:03
    
I've only recently been introduced to recursion and, to be completely honest, it seemed like a good idea at the time. I appreciate input on my technique, it's something i'm trying to refine. –  Sparky Nov 19 '09 at 21:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
void MegaNumber::multiplyAssign(int operand, int index)
{
    data[index] *=operand;
    if(index<data.size()) multiplyAssign(operand, index+1);
    if(data[index] > 9) carry(index);
}

index is 0 based, while data.size() is 1 based so to say, meaning data.size() returns number 1 greater than the largest valid index. So looks like you intention was

if( index < data.size() - 1) multiplyAssign(operand, index+1);

Then it works.
P.S. break your code into lines, whoever has to maintain your code will thank you for that:

if (index < data.size() - 1) 
{
    multiplyAssign(operand, index + 1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I didn't catch, many thanks. –  Sparky Nov 19 '09 at 21:56
    
Though some conventions say any time you use more than one line, you need braces. I find that reasonable, not much work, and closer to what those learning the language expect. –  Roger Pate Nov 19 '09 at 22:49
    
I tend to agree with those conventions and usually curlybrace. Post is edited. Thanks. –  BostonLogan Nov 20 '09 at 1:00

You use data[index] before checking if it's a valid index, in multiplyAssign:

data[index] *= operand;
if(index<data.size()) multiplyAssign(operand, index+1);

Also use '0' instead of 48. This is easier, clearer, and less bug-prone.

share|improve this answer
2  
If this isn't a performance-critical part of your code, consider using std::vector's at member instead of operator[]; it provides bounds-checking and will help you find this sort of error more quickly. –  James McNellis Nov 19 '09 at 20:47
    
Good advice any time you haven't explicitly checked the index immediately before; change it later if it's a performance bottleneck. –  Roger Pate Nov 19 '09 at 20:55
    
Good advice, thanks. –  Sparky Nov 19 '09 at 22:00

I think the problem could be here: data[index+1]+=temp;

This element could not be exist if index parameter eq. to size of data.

So, my recommendations:

  • Use Iterators to access std::vector
  • Check bound conditions if you do not use Iterators
share|improve this answer

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