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I was wondering if the following is possible, and if it is, then how I would go about doing it. Lets say that I have a bunch of entries in a MySQL table with some similar values. I do a regular GROUP BY to combine them into entries that are more readable, but one of the columns is a Time value which is different for every single entry. What I want to do is add a column to every entry that is the result of the GROUP BY statement which contains a date range for all of the entries that went into the group. For example, if I have the following:

+------+------+------------+--------------------+
| id   | name | work_date  | daily_typing_pages |
+------+------+------------+--------------------+
|    1 | John | 2007-01-24 |                250 |
|    2 | Ram  | 2007-05-27 |                220 |
|    3 | Jack | 2007-05-06 |                170 |
|    3 | Jack | 2007-04-06 |                100 |
|    4 | Jill | 2007-04-06 |                220 |
|    5 | Zara | 2007-06-06 |                300 |
|    5 | Zara | 2007-02-06 |                350 |
+------+------+------------+--------------------+

The result of a GROUP BY name would be this:

+------+----------+
| name | COUNT(*) |
+------+----------+
| Jack |        2 |
| Jill |        1 |
| John |        1 |
| Ram  |        1 |
| Zara |        2 |
+------+----------+

But I would want something like this:

+------+----------+-------------------------+
| name | COUNT(*) |        DateRange        |
+------+----------+-------------------------+
| Jack |        2 | 2007-04-06 - 2007-05-06 |
| Jill |        1 | 2007-04-06              |
| John |        1 | 2007-01-24              |
| Ram  |        1 | 2007-05-27              |
| Zara |        2 | 2007-02-06 - 2007-06-06 |
+------+----------+-------------------------+

If anyone can help out with this, it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use the case flow control statement :)

select name, count(*), 
     case when count(*) > 1 then concat(min(work_date), ' - ', max(workdate) 
        else work_date end as  DateRange   
from fooTable 
group by id;
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That seems to have worked. Thanks so much! –  RedHack Jul 16 '13 at 13:39

I would simply do this:

SELECT
  `name`,
  COUNT(id) AS `count`,
  MIN(`work_date`) AS `min_work_date`,
  MAX(`work_date`) as `max_work_date`
FROM table
GROUP BY `name`

This would give you the minimum and maximum dates as separate columns, which might be useful in case you need to apply post-aggregation filtering to the results using a HAVING clause.

For example if you wanted to find all cases where the persons max_work_date is more than 30 days after the min_work_date

SELECT
  `name`,
  COUNT(id) AS `count`,
  MIN(`work_date`) AS `min_work_date`,
  MAX(`work_date`) as `max_work_date`
FROM table
GROUP BY `name`
HAVING DATEDIFF(`max_work_date`,`min_work_date`) > 30 
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