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I have written a program which uses morris traversal for traversing a binary tree. And for curiosity i started doing the benchmarking between inorder traversal and morris traversal. I found that after running for 1000 times the average time for morris traversal is 5795 and for recursive inorder traversal is 2457 which is nearly twice as fast as morris traversal.

I think that morris traversal which uses threaded binary tree has complexity O(NlogN) and recursive inorder traversal has O(N), so obviously morris traversal will take more time. My question are as per below:

  • is the time complexity that i have mention is correct?
  • if morris traversal is pretty slow here then what is the use case of this in java world where recursion is not really costly.
  • whether my assertion that recursion is not costly in java w.r.t. languages like C is correct or not? Thanks in advance.

CODE SAMPLE:

public class ThreadedBinaryTree<T extends Comparable<T>>
{
private TreeNode root;

public void morrisTraverse()
{
    TreeNode current = root;
    if(current == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    while(current != null)
    {
        if(current.left != null)
        {
            TreeNode temp = current.left;
            while(true)
            {
                if(temp.right == null) break;
                if(temp.right == current) break;
                temp = temp.right;
            }

            if(temp.right == null)
            {
                //create the link to predecessor
                temp.right = current;
                current = current.left;
            }
            else
            {
                //remove the link
                temp.right = null;
                //System.out.println(current.t);
                current = current.right;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            //System.out.println(current.t); 
            current = current.right;
        }
    }
}

public void inorder()
{
    inorder(root);
}

private void inorder(TreeNode node)
{
    if(node != null)
    {
        inorder(node.left);
        //System.out.println(node.t);
        inorder(node.right);
    }
}

private static class TreeNode<T extends Comparable<T>>
{
    private T t;
    private TreeNode left;
    private TreeNode right;

    private TreeNode(T t)
    {
        this.t = t;
    }
}
}

DRIVER PROGRAM:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    ThreadedBinaryTree binaryTree = new ThreadedBinaryTree();
    binaryTree.insert(500);
    binaryTree.insert(20);
    binaryTree.insert(15);
    binaryTree.insert(25);
    binaryTree.insert(40);
    binaryTree.insert(35);
    ………….
………….. 
…………. some more inserts to tree
    int index = 1;
    long moris = 0;
    long normal = 0;
    while(index <= 1000)
    {
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        binaryTree.morrisTraverse();
        moris += System.nanoTime() -start;
        //System.out.println("__________________________________________________________");
        long start1 = System.nanoTime();
        binaryTree.inorder();
        normal+=System.nanoTime() -start1;
        index++;
    }
    System.out.println(moris/1000);
    System.out.println(normal/1000);
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

is the time complexity that i have mention is correct?

No, the Morris traversal is linear as well.

if morris traversal is pretty slow here then what is the use case of this in java world where recursion is not really costly

Morris uses no extra space. Recursion uses stack space. If this is the difference between having enough memory and not, you probably shouldn't have chosen Java in the first place.

whether my assertion that recursion is not costly in java w.r.t. languages like C is correct or not?

This is a property of evaluation, not the language specification. There are no particular implementation difficulties that would point a priori to one being more efficient than the other.

share|improve this answer
    
No, the Morris traversal is linear as well.. As the algorithm finds inorder predecessor for each node then finding predecessor takes logN and traversal is N. So time complexity comes to O(NlogN). Please correct me if i am wrong. Thanks. –  Trying Jul 16 '13 at 14:11
1  
@Trying O(log n) worst case, in a balanced tree (which this isn't), but the amortized cost is O(1). –  David Eisenstat Jul 16 '13 at 14:17
    
+1 for your effort. Still confused with the amortized cost. Can you tell me one thing, suppose Tree is balanced binary tree and i am doing inorder and morris traversal. Can i say worst case time complexity is O(N) and O(NlogN)? please guide me to some link for amortized cost if possible. –  Trying Jul 16 '13 at 14:26
1  
@Trying Each tree edge is traversed once going down and once going up. The average number of edges traversed per node is O(1), because there are n - 1 edges and n nodes. –  David Eisenstat Jul 16 '13 at 15:24
    
you are correct but i think u have not seen my code public void morrisTraverse() it is creating the threaded binary tree and traversing upon it and reinitializing to initial tree. As i have have combined creation and traversal in a single phase, so creation of threaded binary tree takes O(NLogN) and traversal takes O(N). Hence my confusion, if I had separated the two then i would have calculated the complexity properly. Please conform. Thanks. –  Trying Jul 17 '13 at 12:43

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