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In my game engine I have a List of Entity objects, of which there are many subclasses (e.g. Player, Cube, Camera, etc). I would like to have a method where I pass a Class object in, and end up with a List of the same class - e.g. I'd like to say something like this:

List<Box> boxes = getEntities(Box.class);

So far I have this:

public List<Entity> getEntities(Class<? extends Entity> t) {
    ArrayList<Entity> list = new ArrayList<>();

    for (Entity e : entities) {
        if (e.getClass() == t) {
            list.add(e);
        }
    }

    return Collections.unmodifiableList(list);
}

But of course that returns a List of Entitys, which means each instance in the List must be cast to the Box class. Is there a way to do this properly in Java?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I recommend the following, which builds on the existing answers, but avoids @SuppressWarnings, etc:

public <E extends Entity> List<E> getEntities(Class<E> type) {

    List<E> list = new ArrayList<>();

    for (Entity e : entities) {
        if (type.isInstance(e)) {
            list.add(type.cast(e));
        }
    }

    return Collections.unmodifiableList(list);
}

Or if you're using Guava:

public <E extends Entity> ImmutableList<E> getEntities(Class<E> type) {
    return ImmutableList.copyOf(Iterables.filter(entities, type));
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's amazing! I did write something similar, but with E extends Entity in each pair of <>'s - it didn't like that! So you just put the generic types after the access modifier then? – Javawag Jul 16 '13 at 10:22
1  
@Javawag Exactly - you only need to specify the upper bound (extends Entity) when declaring the type parameter for the method (after modifiers and before return type). Once it's declared you can just refer to it like any other type. – Paul Bellora Jul 16 '13 at 14:28

Make your method generic, with an upper bound.

public <T extends Entity> List<T> getEntities(Class<T> t) {

Then replace Entity with T in the next line of your code.

ArrayList<T> list = new ArrayList<>;

EDIT

As @arshajii pointed out in a comment, e will need to be casted to T, to match the type of list.

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2  
You'll need the cast (T) e in the for-loop, and you might want an @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") to go along with it. – arshajii Jul 15 '13 at 21:47
1  
@arshajii Noooo!!! Use t.cast (or don't do this sort of thing). – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 16 '13 at 0:06
    
@TomHawtin-tackline What would be the difference, in this case (aside from the warning)? – arshajii Jul 16 '13 at 0:39
    
Or are you suggesting t.cast specifically to avoid the warning? – arshajii Jul 16 '13 at 0:56

Try this:

public static List<? extends Entity> getEntities(Class<? extends Entity> t) {
    ArrayList<Entity> list = new ArrayList<Entity>();

    for (Entity e : entities) {
        if (e.getClass() == t) {
            list.add(e);
        }
    }

    return Collections.unmodifiableList(list);
}

and then you can call:

List<Box> boxes = (List<Box>) getEntities(Box.class);

Now you don't have to cast every single object of the list.

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