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I'm trying to replace/match with a regular expression based on some simple grammatical concepts. It's late, and I approached the regular expression website with the usual confidence that I could get the thing learnt in an evening. I do this about once every six months. Yes, I'm foolish.

Anyway, just in case there are any takers up at this hour (or indeed across the pond) could someone please give me a regular expression that upholds some simple grammatical rules:

  • commas (,) periods (.) and single quotes (') are never preceded by 1 or more spaces.
  • commas (,) periods (.) are always followed by one space (no more, no less).
  • commas (,) periods (.) and spaces ( ) are never repeated more than once.
  • the first double quote (") in a pair is never followed by one or more spaces, and the last is always followed by one space or a period (.) character.
  • the last double quote should not have any spaces ( ) before it.

Some general explanation would definitely warrant an upvote, as I'm sure this will help me in my quest for regex understanding.

Sorry to dampen the mood but I'm using Actionscript 3 to implement this. Not sure which regex engine it leverages but no doubt it'll have a few quirks to it. It's worth a shot in any regex implementation you're used to, though.

Here's a visual:

// string before

var string:String = '" Hello ,my name is Shennan ,, "he said  .  ';

string = string.replace(/* your regex magic */, /* replace with */);

trace(string); /* output: "Hello, my name is Shennan," he said. */
share|improve this question
    
If you want a parser, write a parser. –  Carl Norum Jul 15 '13 at 22:39
    
Did I mention compassion gets you upvotes? Elaborate slightly - would you say this was beyond regex? –  shennan Jul 15 '13 at 22:42
1  
I don't know about "beyond" regular expressions, but it will be easier to write, easier to maintain, and will likely run faster if you just write a proper parser instead. –  Carl Norum Jul 15 '13 at 22:43
1  
is there a reason you want to do all that with one regex? seems like it would be pretty simple to break this down into multiple match/substitutions, just to make things easier. –  sgroves Jul 15 '13 at 23:03
    
I think you're both right about the breakdown. A parser consisting of several regex's would do the trick nicely. But an answer with some hints as to what those regex's might look like would be good... –  shennan Jul 15 '13 at 23:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This handles the spaces before and after commas and periods:

var pattern:RegExp = / *([,.]) */g;
string.replace(pattern, "$1 ");

This handles the spaces before single quotes:

var pattern:RegExp = / *'/g;
string.replace(pattern, "'");

This handles repetitious commas, periods, and single quotes:

var pattern:RegExp = /([,.'])\1*/g;
string.replace(pattern, "$1");

There is no easy way to handle paired quotes, because, for example, quoted material (e.g. speech) that gets broken up into paragraphs often re-open quotes without closing quotes in the previous paragraphs. If and only if quotes are guaranteed to be paired evenly, then you can use:

var pattern:RegExp = /" *([^"]*)"/g;
string.replace(pattern, '"$1"');

 

var pattern:RegExp = /("[^"]*")(?![. ])/g;
string.replace(pattern, '$1 ');

Actionscript 3 supports backreferences as well as negative lookaheads, so all of the above should work, but admittedly I have not tested them (yet, as I need to run out).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort here. Unfortunately both these answers need tweaking. For one, the AS3 regex shorthand seems to only accept /regex/ with an added g for good measure. Both answers' removal of repetitious punctuation don't work (unsure why). I have also added an extra requirement which I felt I had left out, the last bullet point on the menu... –  shennan Jul 16 '13 at 0:06
    
@shennan - Try now. The repetition may not have worked when you converted to //g notation if you didn't unescape the backslash. –  Andrew Cheong Jul 16 '13 at 1:42
    
I think your comma/period regex should be like so / *?([,.]) *?/g to incorporate the fact that it doesn't have to have any number of spaces behind or a spaces in front? –  shennan Jul 16 '13 at 11:11
    
@shennan - No, *? would mean a non-greedy * quantifier. * already means "0 or more." *? would incorrectly match as few spaces as possible. –  Andrew Cheong Jul 16 '13 at 11:57
    
I apologise. I must have confused myself slightly. Thanks to both you and sgroves for the help. –  shennan Jul 16 '13 at 12:38

I've broken the process into a series of regex substitutions based on your rules. Haven't tested these, but comparing with acheong87's answer they look right to me:

--

Rule 1: commas (,) periods (.) and single quotes (') are never preceded by 1 or more spaces.

Easy, just match one or more spaces (\s+), followed by a comma, period, or single quote ([,.']). Capture the comma, period, or single quote with parens (()) so you can use it in your substitution as $1:

var pattern:RegExp = /\s+([.,'])/g;
string.replace(pattern, '$1');

--

Rule 2: commas (,) periods (.) are always followed by one space (no more, no less).

Let's break this into two regexes. First, match a comma or period ([,.]) followed by one or more spaces (\s+) and replace those spaces with one space:

var pattern:RegExp = /([.,])\s+)/g;
string.replace(pattern, '$1 ');

Then, match a comma or period followed by anything that's NOT a space (\S)—here I do this with a negative lookahead, but there are other ways—and replace it with the comma or period followed by a single space:

var pattern:RegExp = /([.,])(?!\s)/g;
string.replace(pattern, '$1 ');

--

Rule 3: commas (,) periods (.) and spaces ( ) are never repeated more than once.

Simple enough:

var pattern:RegExp = /([,.\s])+/g;
string.replace(pattern, '$1');

--

Rule 4 + 5: the first double quote (") in a pair is never followed by one or more spaces, and the last is always followed by one space or a period (.) character. The last double quote should not have any spaces ( ) before it.

Like acheong87 says, this is a little trickier. Assuming you only have paired quotes, you could use these rules:

var pattern:RegExp = /"\s*([^"]*)"/g;
string.replace(pattern, '"$1"');

var pattern2:RegExp = /"([^"]*)\s*"(?![.\s])/g;
string.replace(pattern2, '"$1".');

This assumes you want to add a period after any closing quote that is not followed by a space or period. You could change that last argument to '"$1" ' if you want to use a space in that case instead.


You could greatly simplify these rules if you'd like. For instance, if you apply the Rule 3 regex first, you won't need to account for repeated spaces in the other rules. This means you wouldn't need the first regex in Rule 2 and could just use the second one.

Also, see acheong87's great answer for some nice examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort here. Unfortunately both these answers need tweaking. For one, the AS3 regex shorthand seems to only accept /regex/ with an added g for good measure. Both answers' removal of repetitious punctuation don't work (unsure why). I have also added an extra requirement which I felt I had left out, the last bullet point on the menu... –  shennan Jul 16 '13 at 0:05
    
From the AS3 doc: Matches the specifed pattern against the string and returns a new string in which the first match of pattern is replaced with the content specified by repl. The pattern parameter can be a string or a regular expression. The repl parameter can be a string or a function; if it is a function, the string returned by the function is inserted in place of the match. The original string is not modified. So the (best? only?) way here to replace repetious characters is to replace the repl-char with a function that loops util no characters are found –  Pete TNT Jul 16 '13 at 8:26
    
Thanks for the input sgroves, I went with acheong87 as he went the extra mile and converted it to AS3 syntax. Both answers were helpful though. –  shennan Jul 16 '13 at 12:40
    
+1 - IMO, offering an explanation is more the "extra mile" than converting some syntax. (Sorry, didn't read this answer until today.) –  Andrew Cheong Jul 16 '13 at 14:29
    
@shennan cool. i've never used AS3 actually, so i was just copying acheong87's syntax (which i guess is just javascript syntax) :) –  sgroves Jul 16 '13 at 14:38

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